Is Paul struggling to set himself free and live the theatric life he wants?This is my thesis statement for a paper im writing and i need some people who have read the story to answer my question...

Is Paul struggling to set himself free and live the theatric life he wants?

This is my thesis statement for a paper im writing and i need some people who have read the story to answer my question so i can have a better understanding.

Expert Answers
kwoo1213 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

This is a tragic story of a character who has not been able to live his dream of being in the theater.  He is unhappy with his life and feels trapped. He longs to be in the theater and to live his dream, but realistically, he knows that this isn't possible.  He becomes desperate, however, and plots his "escape" from his depressing world and steals money to go to New York even before he is suspended from school.  Living his dream, however, outweighs any obligations he has in the end. 

Paul does manage to live a life of leisure and beauty, but not through hard work, and only for one week. Through lies and crime, he gains access to what he considers his real home, the New York City high life exemplified by the Waldorf Hotel. There, his "surroundings explained him." In the lap of luxury, Paul realizes that "this was what all the struggle was about" and that "money was everything." Cather prompts her readers to consider whether the American dream of wealth might have corrupted Paul, fostering in him a love of materialism which leads to his ruin. (Enotes)

After learning that his father is coming to get him and take him back home, he makes a decision to commit suicide.  He would rather die than return home and live an unhappy, unfulfilled life.

Read the study guide:
Paul's Case

Access hundreds of thousands of answers with a free trial.

Start Free Trial
Ask a Question