Out of these three plays "A Midsummers Night Dream", "Hamlet" or "Henry V" which is your favorite and why?Out of these three plays "A Midsummers Night Dream", "Hamlet" or "Henry V" which is your...

Out of these three plays "A Midsummers Night Dream", "Hamlet" or "Henry V" which is your favorite and why?

Out of these three plays "A Midsummers Night Dream", "Hamlet" or "Henry V" which is your favorite and why?

Asked on by fitter638

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Those are some of my favorite plays.  Of that list, I like Hamlet best.  I have a soft spot for Hamlet, both the play and the character.  It made a big impression on me when I was in high school and read it for the first time.

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Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Huzzah! for Hamlet.  It is a simple story of a man torn between his own morality and his love and respect for his dead father, yet it is as rich and complicated as it gets in the world of language and literature and human nature.  I, too, enjoy Shakespeare's comedies, as well; however, there's nothing like a good tragedy to get the emotions all riled up and flowing. 

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lmetcalf | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

Hamlet for me too.  While I appreciate the intellectual cleverness of Midsummer, I am always finding something new when I read Hamlet, which I do each year for school.  I have found that I don't just have a few favorite scenes or lines anymore -- I have something I appreciate in every scene and speech.  Shakespeare has lasted 400 years because he captures so many universal truths, and some of the best gems are found in the midst of conversations that are not the most well known.  One speech that I relish reading and teaching is in Act 1 Scene 4 when Hamlet is talking to Horatio.  In it, Shakespeare has his tragic hero is talking about tragic flaws.  I find that to be kind of fun and rather clever.  I love surprises like that!  It makes us realize that we probably all have flaw that corrupts us.

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susan3smith | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

Posted on

Hamlet for me as well.  It is unmatched in the beauty of its language, the depth with which it explores fundamental issues, and the many levels on which it operates.  It is a revenge story, a family story, a political story, a generational story, a love story (or failed loved).  The characters come alive for me when I read the play.  I find the older I get, the more I realize how right Shakespeare was about human nature.  I find myself quoting Hamlet in response to current developments more than any other work.

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Hamlet for me I am proud to say. Not that I dislike the others of course, just that for me Hamlet is the most profound and has really been a complete mine of philosophical debate that I have had in my own life. It is the kind of play that forces me to hold a mirror up to my own life and seriously question certain decisions that I have made or attitudes that I have. Not an "easy" play in so many ways but I think I am a richer and better person for the experience of having studied it and wrestled with so many of the issues contained therein.

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linalarocca | College Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

Posted on

A Midsummer Night's Dream is by far my favourite of the three you have listed. I agree with #3 in regards to the tragic heroes and their constant anguish and inner turmoil. Against all of the darkness and constant obsessing of the tragedies is A Midsummer Night's Dream which is fun,fresh, playful and light. It is a breath of fresh air! A great play to view live at an outdoor theatre. The fairies are far more attractive than witches and ghosts, or war and honor. The costumes are usually magnficent. It is truly magical.

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coachingcorner | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

I prefer the play 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' by William Shakespeare as the author has offered us three stories all in one. It is also very pretty both in costumes, landscapes and set with fancy dress masks and so on - I like the fairytale quality. One story is a love story depicting the dynamic changes in the relationships of four youthful characters and another is amusing and funny in terms of the uneducated actors trying to do their best with a very poor play. I also like the third tale which is a fairy story depicting the fairies fighting amongst themselves, king and queen fairies having quarrels and then making up again. The stories seem to be set apart from each other with different actions proceeding at once - this makes it trickier to read than watch - for me.

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

If I had to pick one of these, I would pick the comedy -- "A Midsummer Night's Dream."  This is mainly because of its content.

I personally do not much like tragedy, and I am especially not very fond of Hamlet.  I get tired of Hamlet's brooding and dithering.  I guess it's just too psychological of a play for me.

I think Henry V is too bombastic.  And I just don't really get excited by war and brave deeds.

Really, it's just that I would prefer light comedy to tragedy or drama any day and that's why I'd prefer "Dream" over the other two.

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epollock | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

scuadra,

My favorite play out of the ones you mentioned is Henry V.

We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;

For he to-day that sheds his blood with me

Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,

This day shall gentle his condition: And gentlemen in England now a-bed Shall think themselves accursed they were not here, And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's  Day." (4.3.20.35)

That quote is my favorite line from Shakespeare.

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