Othello believes that his marriage to Desdemona will transform his life from one of primitive "chaos" to one of civilization and contentment. How is this belief shattered?Is there any body who...

Othello believes that his marriage to Desdemona will transform his life from one of primitive "chaos" to one of civilization and contentment. How is this belief shattered?

Is there any body who can help me out in answering this question, please ?

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kiwi | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

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Othello’s belief was really in jeopardy from the beginning, as his union with Desdemona was bound to bring about antagonism within the Venetian community. Desdemona was the beautiful, eligible daughter of a statesman; a girl who was considered to be too precious even for worthy and wealthy suitors such as Roderigo. Their union was bound to have an destabilizing influence on Othello’s relationship with Brabantio, who had considered Othello his friend.

The foundation for the relationship between Desdemona and Othello is also questionable in its origin. There is no doubt that she is prepared to speak up for her husband to deny any impropriety in their courtship, but the reasons given for their blossoming love do not seem to suggest the foundations for a stable, balanced relationship-

She loved me for the dangers I had pass'd,
And I loved her that she did pity them.

A relationship based on pity with a man so accustomed to being celebrated for his strength seems an unsound basis for this marriage.

 In Act II scene I, Othello foreshadows the fact that their relationship could not improve beyond this point as they are reunited in Cyprus. His words are tragically accurate-

 If it were now to die,
'Twere now to be most happy; for I fear
My soul hath her content so absolute
That not another comfort like to this
Succeeds in unknown fate.

The flaws are already present by the time Iago convinces Othello that Desdemona has a relationship with Cassio, and his engineering of the 'ocular proof' of the handkerchief really serves only to confirm Othello's innermost fear: that he is not 'fair' enough for Desdemona.

 

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