Othello Act 1    a. Who is speaking? b. To whom is he/she speaking? c. Setting – where? d. The context (plot or subject of the passage) e. Significance (develops character, plot, attitudes,...

Othello Act 1

 

 

a. Who is speaking?

b. To whom is he/she speaking?

c. Setting – where?

d. The context (plot or subject of the passage)

e. Significance (develops character, plot, attitudes, speech patterns etc.)

 

3. Let him do his spite.

My services which I have done the Signiory

Shall out-tongue his complaints.  ‘Tis yet to know –

Which when I know that boasting is an honor

I shall promulgate – I fetch my life and being

From men of royal siege; and my demerits

May speak unbonneted to as proud a fortune

As this I have reached.  For know, Iago,

But that I love the gentle Desdemona,

I would not my unhoused free condition

Put into circumscription and confine

For the seas worth

 

2. Look to her, Moor, if thou hast eyes to see:

She has deceived her father, and may thee.

 

Asked on by maricar67

1 Answer | Add Yours

kiwi's profile pic

kiwi | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted on

In the first extract from Act 1 scene 2, Othello is speaking to Iago about Brabantio’s assertion that Othello has “stol’n” his daughter Desdemona, and demands that the case be heard by the Duke. Othello is on his way to the Signory as he has been called to a military meeting.

Othello is confident that his deeds in support of Venice will be regarded as more important than any allegations Brabantio can make. Othello says he would not jeopardize his relationship with Desdemona.

The significance of the extract is that Othello is correct, and the Duke does listen to him favourably. However, the incident highlights the prejudice with which Othello is treated in regard to his race and background. His eloquesnt language and bewitching tales are also seen as he explains how he came to elope with Desdemona.

The rhyming couplet is spoken by Brabantio at the end of Othello’s testimony. He is devastated that his daughter has chosen the Moor. Brabantio’s words stay with Othello, and add to Iago’s poisoned insinuations about Desdemona’s infidelity later in the play.

Sources:

We’ve answered 318,948 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question