Orwell juxtaposes two different visions in chapter 7 (AnimalFarm). What are they?What contrasting imagery does Orwell use in his Juxtapositioning of possibility and reality? waht is the reader...

Orwell juxtaposes two different visions in chapter 7 (AnimalFarm). What are they?

What contrasting imagery does Orwell use in his Juxtapositioning of possibility and reality? waht is the reader reminded of? What important message is Orwell sending his readers in this chapter?

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missy575's profile pic

missy575 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

When you use the word vision, it leads me to think in two ways: as a dream, or a planned purpose for the future.

One dream that occurs is the hens:

The three hens who had been the ringleaders in the attempted rebellion over the eggs now came forward and stated Snowball had appeared to them in a dream and insighted them to disobey Napoleon's orders.

This image of disobedience is in contrast to the original rebellion as laid out by Old Major's dream and then followed through by the original rebellion because the first rebellion's intention was to earn freedom; here, the chickens doom themselves to the severest bondage - death.

Another image I see that brings about a contrast is Clover with all the animals huddled about her, just like on that first night's meeting to listen to Old Major's speech. At that point there was a comradere, an excitement, and a kinship in the air among all of animalkind. Here, in chapter 7, again Clover allows all the animals to huddle about her, but this time things are different. Tears, quietness and togetherness radiate among them. I see animals shaking in fear.

These scenes of teerror and slaughter were not what they had aimed at when they had set themselves years ago to work for the overthrow of the human race.

I think this reminds readers to remember the purpose of a cause and to work to hold leaders accountable to that purpose. It shows the detrimental impact of leadership unchecked.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

In my opinion, Orwell is using this chapter mostly to show the reader how totalitarian governments behave when things go wrong in their countries.  They lie to outsiders about how things are going (if that is in their best interests) and they require sacrifices from their people (even though they, the leaders, sacrifice nothing).

In this chapter, Orwell juxtaposes the reality of how hard the animals are working and how much they are suffering, with the optimistic face that is being put on for the outside world.

Another juxtaposition is here as well.  On the one hand, how Napoleon is largely at fault (in reality) for the problems of the farm.  At the same time, he insists that all the problems are caused by Snowball.

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