Organizations and FacebookDo you belive in organizations fighting for a cause and gathering members on FB? Give your reasons why or why not.

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brettd's profile pic

brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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As others have posted, why not?  Social networking is exactly that, social networking.  So as long as Facebook is OK with people using their site to organize, people don't have to become involved in any movements of organizations they aren't interested in, so it seems like a no lose situation.  It is also more likely people will get involved if it becomes more convenient for them to do so.

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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I don't necessarily think it actually makes much of a difference to a cause whether they have a facebook group or not. The ease of joining a group that is set up in protest against something means that it doesn't cost members of such a group anything to join it, which in turn lessens the impact that such an action can have. If all you have to do is click with your mouse on an icon to support the cause, you do not have to sign a petition and actually go out and march and protest, which greatly lessens the impact of your action.

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marbar57 | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

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I like Facebook, not only for supporting an organization but for other things as well. My family is rather large and scattered all over the United States. We set up a private group on Facebook and used it to communicate to everyone about the dates of the reunion, what everyone needed to bring, and as a forum to discuss things. It worked SO well, allowing everyone to get everything worked out and settled before the big event. My sister saw a bad ambulance service situation in Cedar County, Missouri, and used Facebook to relay the facts and rally her friends in reforming the service and making it better for the citizens of the county. It worked! I know my sister, and if she stands up for something, it gets done. Facebook just made it easier for her.

Organizational support on Facebook would be no different than going door to door, putting up flyers or posters, or going before a television camera.  It's just a different type of medium to get your point across, get support, and rally the troops!

lmetcalf's profile pic

lmetcalf | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

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I see no problem with people using Facebook in this way -- it is little different from sending emails or old-fashioned snail mail. Facebook is the way many people stay informed of the things that interest them, and a message can spread quickly and with more divergence on Facebook. And for the better or the worse, just because a person sees something on a Facebook page doesn't mean it will change or affect his or her behavior.

readerofbooks's profile pic

readerofbooks | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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Facebook, as you know, has many users. To use these users as a potential for worthy causes is great thing. More importantly, the organization or person seeking to fight for a good cause has the option to use other social platforms as well. Hence, using facebook is not mutually exclusive to other ways to gain people. In light of this, there is little or no downside.

I would take one more step and say that it would be good for organizations like facebook actually to join these good causes as well. In other words, it would be good if facebook was not only a means for good, but also a force of good as well.

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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I agree with the other posts. Facebook has become a great alternative to letter-writing, emails and phone calls, and most members check the site regularly. It also serves as a visual alternative to the aforementioned methods of communication, giving instant access to photos and videos that may further enhance the recruitment of organizations.

rrteacher's profile pic

rrteacher | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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I can't see why it would be a problem, either, except that it does lend itself to bandwagoneering and somewhat superficial participation in causes. Lots of people "repost" something without really giving it much thought, I think. But I know many people who have held successful fundraisers, even political rallies, that they organized on Facebook. It has now become more of a necessity than an option in spreading information for causes.

bigdreams1's profile pic

bigdreams1 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

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Sure. Facebook has become one of the most popular, and powerful social communication tool in the world.

This could be a very valuable tool toward gathering supporters for various causes, and for letting people know about events that they would not otherwise be able to find information out about.

As a teacher, I have often used facebook to inform the school community about upcoming events at the school.  It is much more efficient and effective than sending home paper flyers.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I don't see why you wouldn't believe in this.  Facebook is a very good way to recruit members as it so good at producing "word of mouth" results.  If one of my friends joins some cause-related page, I see that fact show up in my news feed.  That allows me to know that my friend has done that and to decide whether I want to do so as well.  If an organization recruited a friend of mine in the "real world" I wouldn't know about it and wouldn't have any reason to look into the issue myself.

So, I think it's a really good idea for organizations to do this from a tactical point of view.  And I see no moral issues with them doing so either.

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