What adjectives could be used to describe Slim in chapter 2 from Of Mice and Men?

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Although he is a worker on the ranch, not its owner, Slim is its leader and its soul. He is honest, sincere, careful, and in some ways otherworldly, as he seems too good to be real.

When George and Lennie arrive, the character of Slim is introduced by the boss...

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Although he is a worker on the ranch, not its owner, Slim is its leader and its soul. He is honest, sincere, careful, and in some ways otherworldly, as he seems too good to be real.

When George and Lennie arrive, the character of Slim is introduced by the boss as a “big tall skinner” and assigns them to work with his team. In addition to a physical snapshot, this mention indicates that he is a leader. When they get to the bunkhouse, the old swamper who chats with them also refers to Slim as skinner and says he is a “helluva nice fella.” In contrast to Curley, with his exaggerated rancher style, Slim is described as practical—the swamper that “don’t need to wear no high-heeled boots.”

George and Lenny, along with the reader, also hear Slim before they see him. He is overheard outside the bunkhouse speaking with Curley’s wife, who is standing in the doorway. When he enters, he is described as “a tall man” with “long, black, damp hair” that he is combing while he holds his cowboy hat under one arm.

Steinbeck’s lengthy description that follows is awe-inspiring: he seems more like a hero from folklore than a real person. Slim is not just portrayed as the “royalty” of the crew, with an innate quality of leadership and highly skilled as a skinner, but he is endowed with an almost mythical aura. The author says he has the “majesty” of “royalty” in his movements, and he is the “prince” of the ranch. This sense of majesty applies to his way of moving, and at the end of the passage, Steinbeck says his hands’ actions were “as delicate . . . as those of a temple dancer.” Slim’s natural leadership stems in part from being a careful listener and not a big talker.

His ear heard more than was said to him, and his slow speech had overtones not of thought, but of understanding beyond thought.

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The reader is introduced to the revered, experienced jerkline skinner named Slim in chapter 2 when he enters the bunkhouse and befriends George and Lennie. Slim is described as being wise, respected, and sympathetic. He demonstrates his gentle, friendly nature by kindly introducing himself to George and Lennie and telling them that he wants them to be on his team to buck barley. Slim is portrayed as a trustworthy, understanding man, who seems genuine and benevolent. When Slim takes a seat at the table, he makes George feel comfortable and is depicted as a warm, welcoming individual. Slim’s comments about George and Lennie traveling together reveal that he is an insightful man. It becomes evident that the other workers on the ranch respect Slim and hold him in high regard. The fact that Carlson petitions Slim concerning Candy's ancient dog reveals that Slim is intelligent and wise. As the novella progresses, Slim continues to demonstrate his sympathetic, welcoming nature and is depicted as the most respected man on the ranch. George trusts Slim enough to tell him about the incident in Weed and Slim consoles George after he mercifully kills Lennie before Curley’s mob can capture him.

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A good word to describe Slim in chapter 2 is "avuncular," which means being kind and friendly toward a younger or less experienced person. George and Lennie have just arrived at the ranch, and naturally they need someone to show them the ropes. That's where Slim comes in. What he doesn't know about life on the ranch isn't worth knowing. He tells the newcomers about what kind of man Curley is, how he's always picking fights with bigger guys. That explains why Curley already seems to have taken against Lennie, despite Lennie's not having done anything to hurt him.

Slim also gives the new guys an insight into what kind of woman Curley's wife is. He makes it clear that though incredibly pretty, she's also trouble with a capital T. In respect to both Curley and his wife, Slim's friendly advice will come to be very useful for George and Lennie as the story progresses.

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In Chapter 2 of the John Steinbeck novel, Of Mice and Men, Slim could be described as, conscientious, reflective, and empathetic. There is no doubt that he is a skilled and conscientious worker. In fact, he has the ranches ear--when he talks everyone listens, so he is one of the most respected men on the ranch. In chapter two, he can also be seen as reflective sense he recognizes the bond between George and Lennie. The protectiveness with which they watch out for each other is admirable in his eyes. His empathy is exhibited in many ways. His comments to George, Lennie, and the other men, and also his willingness to dispose of some of his puppies because he knows the mama dog won’t be able to care for all of them. While this might seem cruel it is meant to be compassionate.  

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