online educationwhat impact does online education have on student and teachers?

11 Answers | Add Yours

litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I teach at an online university, and I have also taught at a high school. In many ways there is advantage to online education. You actually get more one on one time with students. However not meeting face to face can be challenging and frustrating at times.
fernholz's profile pic

fernholz | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

Posted on

I have mixed feelings about online learning. On one hand, living in a snowy state, online learning would allow students to attend school even during bad weather, or if they're under the weather.

On the other hand, we learn much about each other through face-to-face contact. Verbal and nonverbal communication are important skills for students to gain. Through online learning words can be misunderstood.

What will happen to our teachers if we only have online schools? Are all teachers prepared/willing to teach this way? What if students don't have internet access and no money to purchase it?

ask996's profile pic

ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

One impact of online education on both teacher and student is lack of relationship building. This relationship building is frequently what makes the educational experience more rewarding and beneficial. Students cannot listen and respond to the thinking of others as is frequently expressed in class discussion, so there is a loss of synergy as well.

lrwilliams's profile pic

lrwilliams | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

I would agree that the biggest appeal of online classes is the flexibility it offers. I think that the courses are getting better as far as having students interact with each other even though they are not in a classroom. As technology advances I think that online courses will continue to become more interactive and provide a better learning experience.

kapokkid's profile pic

kapokkid | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I think it can be a great tool for both teachers and students, particularly because of the fact that it can be conducted asynchronously.  It can be difficult for people that really require the interaction of a physical class, but for those that don't require that, it can work really well with good facilitation and structure.

So it can allow teachers to teach in very different ways and perhaps on top of another job, and it can allow students the same flexibility.

brettd's profile pic

brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

From the classes I've taken online, i loved the flexibility it offered me in terms of pace and timing of classes.  I liked not having to drive anywhere, or pay for the gas of going to a daily class location, but I missed interacting directly with a professor or other students and colleagues.  And some of the online courses are obviously designed to make money or fulfill a credit requirement as opposed to actually teaching things that are valuable.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I taught a number of online classes for some years in the early 2000s.  I quit for many of the reasons outlined in Post 2.  For me, then, the impact of online education was to lower my morale.

I suppose that many high school students that I teach in person are only in my class to "get it done" rather than to learn (as Post 2 says).  However, when I'm teaching them in person I at least have the chance to get them interested via my personality.  Even if they never become truly interested, at least I get to know them and interact with them.  It's much more fun and much more rewarding than the online experience.

For the student, the experience may be somewhat better in that they get credit in a way that is less of a pain.  They don't have to show up at a certain time and place and behave in a certain way.  It's much more independent.

For me as the teacher, though, it's much less fun and rewarding.

clairewait's profile pic

clairewait | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Having taken only one online class in my educational experience (and never having taught one), I'd say that the overall positive impact of classes online is the ease, availability, and informal nature which allows students to work the comfort of their own home, wear what they want, and take things at a comfortable pace (for the most part).

On the negative side, I found that perhaps because of the above reasons, students took my online class far less seriously than classes where I had to show up in person.  I thought the discussion was shallow, answers rote, and most people (myself included) tended to just do the work to "get it done" rather than to learn.  For me, it was a class which didn't fit into my schedule in time to graduate.  It was easy.  In fact, at the time, I called it "a joke."  I realize this is not the experience that everyone has, and certainly it depends on the subject, class, instructor, and other participants, but due to the impersonal nature of online classes, my final thought was that they are ultimately not as good as the "real thing."

luislugo's profile pic

luislugo | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

I have mixed feelings about online learning. On one hand, living in a snowy state, online learning would allow students to attend school even during bad weather, or if they're under the weather.

On the other hand, we learn much about each other through face-to-face contact. Verbal and nonverbal communication are important skills for students to gain. Through online learning words can be misunderstood.

What will happen to our teachers if we only have online schools? Are all teachers prepared/willing to teach this way? What if students don't have internet access and no money to purchase it?

I believe that online classes are designed for adult students, although anyone could benefit from it. The personal development that we go through in high school can never be replaced by online classes. I have to say that online courses requires that everyone participate and post a bio. Some students hardly participate in traditional classes and others never give chance for teachers to know them.

luislugo's profile pic

luislugo | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

I am a student on an online course currently. I have taken classes in traditional college with many difficulties due to my job and responsibilities as a father. I have to say that not everyone is able to learn in an online environment. It requires more determination and responsibility sense. It is deffinately more effective for adult students, but at the end of the day it comes down to how the student applies himself to the work. I believe that the same way teachers go over information and discuss it to make students familiarize with the topics, online students relate to the material and actually learn about it. I have learned more online than in traditional classes, maybe because of the amount of information at hand through the internet. The fact that we have to do research and reading to answer questions and write essays, make us learn. As I said this is not for everyone but it does work.

lisastudy123's profile pic

lisastudy123 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

Looking for online College or schools?

 

Search your courses now

Visit http://collegesurfing.tk

We’ve answered 318,928 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question