Which characters in Moliere's Tartuffe exemplify the theme of Religious Hypocrisy versus True Christian Virtue and how do you see this?

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Tartuffe is the religious hypocrite and crook who deceives Orgon and Orgon's mother, Madame Pernelle, into thinking he is an exceptional, self-sacrificial holy man. He is so successful that Orgon decides that Tartuffe should marry his daughter.

Tartuffe, however, is all show and is out to swindle Orgon. Tartuffe makes...

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Tartuffe is the religious hypocrite and crook who deceives Orgon and Orgon's mother, Madame Pernelle, into thinking he is an exceptional, self-sacrificial holy man. He is so successful that Orgon decides that Tartuffe should marry his daughter.

Tartuffe, however, is all show and is out to swindle Orgon. Tartuffe makes a great show of having a hair shirt and scourge, but loves women and the good life. He shows his hypocrisy by trying to seduce Orgon's wife Elmire, while pretending to be pietous.

Elmire is an important counterweight to Tartuffe. She is a woman of good sense who quickly sees through Tartuffe and deplores that her husband has been so deceived. She also wants to save her daughter from marriage to this creep. When Tartuffe propositions her, the first person she thinks about is not herself but her daughter. She tries to strike a bargain with Tartuffe that she won't expose him if he gives up Mariane. We note, too, that unlike Tartuffe, Elmire genuinely is loyal to Orgon and has no desire to betray him sexually. She thus shows Christian integrity in her fidelity to her husband and puts others ahead of herself.

Cléante is also a good man who sees through Tartuffe, but he can be a bit pompous with his long, boring speeches.

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The title character, Tartuffe, is the character who exemplifies religious hypocrisy in Moliere's play. He lays claim to Christian acts , such as giving charity to the poor and unfortunate, when, in fact, he is engaged in immoral practices or acts, such seduction of a friend's wife. He also presents himself as a moral authority for those beneath him, giving them instruction in how to behave when his behavior is a moral shame.
The character Cléante is the representative of true Christian values and expounds to Orgon on the fact that true Christianity doesn't make a display of itself but lives a quiet virtuousness and practices what it preaches. He later remonstrates with Organ when the latter shows a vindictive retaliatory attitude toward Tartuffe who has been arrested. Cléante admonishes that true Christian values require them to hope for Tartuffe's repentance and for a lighter sentence to be past for his punishment.

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