In "Because I could not stop for death," is Dickinson arguing that death is a part of the endless cycle of nature?One should not fear the death since it is the integral part of the endless cycle of...

In "Because I could not stop for death," is Dickinson arguing that death is a part of the endless cycle of nature?

One should not fear the death since it is the integral part of the endless cycle of nature.

How is the above statement brought in the poem Because i could not stop for death.

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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The poem "Because I could not stop for Death" by Emily Dickinson has a tremendously ironic effect as there is a blithe tone to the poem that is at odds with the theme of death.  In Dickinson's poem, dying is compared to an unexpected carriage ride with a very gentlemanly driver, who "kindly" stops for the speaker because she is too busy with life.  But, the ride in the horse-drawn carriage is not to the end; instead the speaker is accompanied by "Immortality."

That death is part of the endless cycle of nature is evinced in the passage of the carriage past children playing in the schoolyard, the fields of productive grain, and then the setting sun.  These metaphors represent youth, productive adulthood, and old age respectively. Even the tomb is part of nature as it appears to be "A Swelling of the Ground."  And, the speaker has, indeed, achieved immortality as she yet addresses the reader from her grave,

Since then 'tis centuries, and yet each
Feels shorter than the day
I first surmised the horses' heads
Were toward eternity

Clearly, Dickinson's metaphor of death as a carriage-ride imaginatively captures the powerful and inevitable experience of all humanity with a playfulness and light tone that belies any unnatural feeling.

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