In ONE paragraph, discuss a negative 'affect' of the media's bias?

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I will answer this question in two ways, because often people confuse the word affect and effect.

A negative 'affect' of the media's bias is the placement of blame, criticism, and biased commentary while trying to offer facts. This is a human tendency to correlate crime to socioeconomic status, and this is overall a form of "affect" that the media continues to spread out.

A negative "effect" of the media's bias is that it generalizes an idea, turns it into a "cliche", and then such idea becomes an expectation that the audience might take to, and will then continue to expand and let take over popular beliefs. If, for example, the media focuses on one specific gang, or group with the slightest desire to spread some tendency against that group, automatically everything surrounding that group (neighborhood, ethnic background, socioeconomical status) becomes mixed with the media, and might produce a tendency for biased thinking among the public. This is what leads to generalizations, and to creating stereotypes.

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This sounds like it might be an assignment for you to consider. It is an assignment that should be based on fact, but quite often because the nature of media requires audience consumerism involves opinion.

I would consider misinformation or spin of information a problem of the media. Choice of which stories to present is a problem of the media. Using propaganda's techniques of saturation, slogan, scape-goating and the persuasive appeals of ethos, pathos and logos are a problem. Ownership political persuasion of a media outlet is a problem. The gullibility of the under-educated or over-educated is a problem.

Take any one of these aforementioned issues and look for examples in our society regarding the results of that one problem.

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