If one were to look only at the Federalist Paper #10, does Madison agree with Hamilton or Jefferson on this issue?

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The Federalist Papers were published under the author Publius, but individual authorship has been determined for the discrete papers. Federalist No. 10, which was written by James Madison, continues the theme of Federalist No. 9, written by Alexander Hamilton.

The Federalists were in favor of a strong union, or republic....

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The Federalist Papers were published under the author Publius, but individual authorship has been determined for the discrete papers. Federalist No. 10, which was written by James Madison, continues the theme of Federalist No. 9, written by Alexander Hamilton.

The Federalists were in favor of a strong union, or republic. They saw this as a way to protect the young nation and to ensure more equal participation of all areas. The strength of the union would offset what they saw as the likely danger from diverse factions that could prevent further development or, at worst, tear the country apart.

Madison used the concept of "republic" in reference to organized units of governance of various scales, especially states and countries. He worried that an individual state might gain too much power. Jefferson, in contrast, saw a powerful, controlling federal government as a greater danger. He was in the anti-federalist camp.

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In the Federalist Paper #10, Madison agrees with Hamilton regarding the structure of government and its relation to controlling mob mentality and violence, and as such, encourages the ratification of the US Constitution. In the Federalist Paper #10, Madison believes that a strong centralized government, which Hamilton supported, will result in curtailing mob rule that he believes would occur in a decentralized, direct democracy form of government. Madison is concerned that factions, which he acknowledges will occur in any form of political system, will not be as charged and powerful under a centralized federal government. Madison clarifies that he does not seek to hinder liberty or create a politically or socially homogenous society but, rather, is interested in how to control the effects of factions, from groups, to organized political parties, through a strong federal government.

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