On what page of To Kill a Mockingbird does Atticus say to Scout, "If you can learn a simple trick, Scout, you'll get along a lot better with all kinds of folks. You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view"?

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In the 2002 First Perennial Classic edition of To Kill a Mockingbird published by HarperCollins, this quote appears on page 33, three pages from the end of chapter 3. This quote introduces a theme of the novel, and the quote is repeated near the end of the book. Here it goes on to say "until you climb into his skin and walk around in it." Atticus is trying to teach Scout how to get along with people. Empathy is crucial to effective interpersonal skills, which Atticus, a brilliant lawyer and kind man, understands. Atticus urges Scout to be more tolerant of Miss Caroline, the new first grade teacher. Scout will be less angry at her teacher if she considers the events of the day from Miss Caroline's point of view. Being new to Maycomb, the young woman didn't understand some quirks of the community that others took for granted, and therefore she made what seemed like stupid mistakes.

At the end of the novel, when Scout walks Boo Radley back home after he has saved her life in the Halloween incident, she stands on his porch and looks at the familiar street from his perspective. She says it is enough to stand on his porch—not get into his skin (chapter 31, p. 321). She has learned empathy in many ways throughout the novel, from trying to understand black people's experience in Maycomb, to appreciating Aunt Alexandra, to accepting the friendship and protection of Boo Radley. Atticus's instruction and example has finally paid off.

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In Chapter 3, on page 39, Atticus teaches Scout the importance of understanding others' perspectives. Scout is a naive child with a quick temper at the beginning of the novel. Like most children, Scout is unaware of how other people view certain situations. Her narrow perspective gets her into trouble on the first day of school. In Chapter 3, following a misunderstanding with her teacher, Scout goes home and tells her father about her rough first day of school. Scout tells Atticus that she would like to stay home for the remainder of the school year. Atticus encourages Scout to consider the viewpoint of other people, and "climb into their skin and walk around in it" to understand their perspective. He explains to Scout that Miss Caroline made an honest mistake handing Walter Cunningham a quarter because she was unaware of his family's background. Scout tried to explain Walter's situation and upset Miss Caroline in the process. Following her father's lesson, Scout tries her best to see things from other people's point of view. Later on, when Jem is moody after retrieving his pants from the Radleys' yard, Scout attempts to "walk in his shoes" to understand how he is feeling.

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