Old Major's view of the future was a bleak one for the animals under Jones. He even predicted that Boxer would be sold to the knacker. His dream was..for a utopian society without man and his evil...

Old Major's view of the future was a bleak one for the animals under Jones. He even predicted that Boxer would be sold to the knacker. His dream was..

for a utopian society without man and his evil ways. Discuss Old Major's view of the future and show how and why he was both correct and mistaken in his thinking. (At least 10 sentences)

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missy575's profile pic

missy575 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Old Major's assertions of happiness and comfort as shown in the song The Beasts of England were perhaps the most mistaken perceptions he had.

He imagined a land wherein all animals could graze as they wished and have comfort in their stalls. Snowball had really bought into the dream and envisioned heated stalls and endless food. However, neither considered the road necessary to get to that point. Animals truly did not have the capacity without the intellect of man to achieve these feats. When they tried, a leader emerged who selfishly stole from the animals who worked hard to give to his select few. This equality Old Major dreamed of was never grasped.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Old Major's dream of a better life for the animals was "correct" in some ways.  Most significantly, I would say, there was no longer any killing of animals for their meat.  Old Major talked in his speech about how most pigs would be slaughtered while still young.  Napoleon never stooped so far as to actually kill any animals for food (not even to sell to the outside for food).  So, in that way, Old Major's vision came true.

But his larger vision does not come true.  He sees a world where the animals all live together in harmony and prosperity.  In his vision, there is true equality.  This clearly does not happen.  Instead, the pigs take over and, by the end of the book, come to behave almost exactly like the people who they had driven away from the farm.

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