Of what does Darnay accuse his uncle in book 2, chapter 9 of A Tale of Two Cities?

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Monseigneur the Marquis sits down for dinner in chapter 9 of A Tale of Two Cities and awaits his nephew Charles Darnay. When Darnay finally arrives at the chateau, the Marquis notices that his nephew has taken a long time to travel from London. Darnay apologizes for the delay, and...

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Monseigneur the Marquis sits down for dinner in chapter 9 of A Tale of Two Cities and awaits his nephew Charles Darnay. When Darnay finally arrives at the chateau, the Marquis notices that his nephew has taken a long time to travel from London. Darnay apologizes for the delay, and the two exchange pleasantries; but, once they are alone, things quickly become contentious.

Darnay accuses his uncle of being a part of a plot to have him thrown in prison in France. The Marquis does not deny the claim but laments the powers and privileges that the aristocracy has lost as well as the fall of his family name. Darnay asserts that their family has done wrong and must face the consequences, and he then goes on to renounce France and his property. Monseigneur mocks him for his lack of success in England.

An ominous night falls, and eventually, the sun rises, and the villagers wake to begin their day of hard work. The occupants of the chateau awaken to a gruesome discovery: the Marquis has been murdered in the night. He is found with a knife in his heart, along with a piece of paper reading, "Drive him fast to his tomb. This, from Jacques."

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