In "Ode to a Nightangle" what is the 3rd stanza talking about?Fade far away, dissolve, and quite forget What thou among the leaves hast never known,The weariness, the fever, and the fret Here,...

In "Ode to a Nightangle" what is the 3rd stanza talking about?

Fade far away, dissolve, and quite forget
What thou among the leaves hast never known,
The weariness, the fever, and the fret
Here, where men sit and hear each other groan;
Where palsy shakes a few, sad, last gray hairs,
Where youth grows pale, and spectre-thin, and dies;
Where but to think is to be full of sorrow
And leaden-eyed despairs,
Where Beauty cannot keep her lustrous eyes,
Or new Love pine at them beyond to-morrow

Asked on by hni

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ms-einstein's profile pic

ms-einstein | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Assistant Educator

Posted on

The speaker wants to join the nightingale in the woods and forget his own troubles and sorrows. The speaker perceives the woods as a beautiful, tranquil place devoid of worries and death. In his view, the nightingale has it made. However, the speaker cannot shake his thoughts of a world where people grow older and sickly and lose their youth. He despises the idea of people growing older. The speaker seems obsessed with death, although he never mentions it directly. The enemy he identifies is thinking, which leads to sorrow and despair. For example, he knows every beautiful, young girl is going to lose her looks as she ages, and that red hot steamy love you found today inevitably will turn cold. This dude is dark and thinks dark. He would not be a great date unless you like brooding guys.

marygronan's profile pic

marygronan | College Teacher | (Level 1) Honors

Posted on

In stanza 3 the poet expresses his wish to fade into the forest with the nightingale. By doing this he would  forget worldly troubles . Troubles the bird had never known. He is referring here to the "weariness, the fever , and the fret" and all the other troubles of the world such as ageing, sadness, sickness, fading beauty that occurs in human life. He sees the world as a place where  "youth grows pale and "where beauty cannot keep her lustrous eyes." He wishes to be lost in the beautiful voice of the nightingale and and feel far away from the mortal troubles that are part of the poets life.

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