Illustration of Jack Worthing in a top hat and formal attire, and a concerned expression on his face

The Importance of Being Earnest

by Oscar Wilde
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Now that we know Jack was always Ernest, what are we supposed to think as we walk out the playhouse door?  

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Well, there are a lot of good laughs along the way, since Wilde used social confrontations and side quips in his plays to poke fun at society. A few are even 'food for thought' for later on (as you're walking out the door, as you say), although the relevence must...

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Well, there are a lot of good laughs along the way, since Wilde used social confrontations and side quips in his plays to poke fun at society. A few are even 'food for thought' for later on (as you're walking out the door, as you say), although the relevence must be seen in the context of the times in which Wilde lived. The enigma of Earnest might be over at the end of the play, but solving the mystery of "Whoisit?" (rather than "Whodunit?") is not really the main issue. If that is the only aspect which you found of interest, then a reread (rather than just seeing the play) of the script is in order. Knowing social issues at the fore during Wilde's literary career as well as problems in his personal life are also important to "get" the messages behind the scenes.

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