Novels, Stories, Etc. About Disasters? What are some titles of stories, novels, plays, or poems that have disasters or accidents (like ship or train wrecks) as their main subject?I'm thinking of...

Novels, Stories, Etc. About Disasters?

What are some titles of stories, novels, plays, or poems that have disasters or accidents (like ship or train wrecks) as their main subject?

I'm thinking of works like Crane's "The Open Boat" that is fiction based upon an event that Crane actually experienced or even songs like "Casey Jones" that relate, in a fictionalized way, a disastrous train wreck.

Expert Answers
Karen P.L. Hardison eNotes educator| Certified Educator

A couple of my favorite disasters in the fiction genre are Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson, the movie Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (Peter Weir, 2003) with Russel Crow (and it is a novel though I've never read it). A true-life disaster that is a little hard to take is Alive, the story of a Uruguayan rugby team's airplane crash in the Andes.It was also a movie (Frank Marshall, 1993). another disaster movie is Poseidon (Wolfgan Petersen, 2006).

cybil eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Here are some titles of poems:

"The Wreck of the Hesperus" by Longfellow

"The Wreck of the Deutschland" by Hopkins

"The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald" by G. Lightfoot

"The Tay Bridge Disaster" by McGonagall

"Convergence of the Twain" by Hardy (about the Titanic)

"Auto Wreck" by Shapiro

"The Wreck of the Admella" by Angas

mwestwood eNotes educator| Certified Educator

One powerful book on a disaster is The High Girders (1956) written by John Prebble.  This is a record of the The Tay Bridge disaster of 1879, one of the worst ever in British rail history.  Later, in 1972, John Thomas interpreted the event in his New Light on the Tay Bridge.

A Night to Remember by Walter Lord relates the sinking of the HMS Titanic.

 

accessteacher eNotes educator| Certified Educator

You might want to read Into the Wild, which charts one young man's disastrous attempt to live by his own wits alone in Alaska, trying to follow the philosophy of Thoreau. I must admit, I don't go for disaster stories that much, but I found this a very oddly compelling book that I struggled to put down.

carebr2 | Student

Stephen Layne's this side of paradise and Neal Shusterman's Shadow Club

Read the study guide:
The Open Boat

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