The novel is a vivid commentary on the sufferings of the people of Afghanistan under the Taliban regime. Elaborate.The novel is a vivid commentary on the sufferings of the people of Afghanistan...

The novel is a vivid commentary on the sufferings of the people of Afghanistan under the Taliban regime. Elaborate.

The novel is a vivid commentary on the sufferings of the people of Afghanistan under the Taliban regime. Elaborate.

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scarletpimpernel's profile pic

scarletpimpernel | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

There's not much to add to what the previous posts have mentioned, but if you want a more thorough discussion of what life is like under the Taliban, read Hosseini's A Thousand Splendid Suns.  Unlike The Kite Runner, which is only partially during Taliban rule, a portion of Suns focuses on characters who endure the Soviet invasion and live under Taliban rule.  It provides an especially vivid picture of the oppression of women in the country.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

It is hard to argue with this statement.  The relevant parts of the novel clearly do show that the people of Afghanistan suffered while ruled by the Taliban (assuming that they stuff that happens in the novel is accurate).

There are a few examples in the book that make this clear.  Amir has to wear a fake beard for fear of getting trouble with the religous enforcers.  Once in the city, he is told not to look at the young men in the trucks for fear that they will kill him just for looking at them.  He tells of the couple being stoned to death for committing adultery.  He mentions the dead body hanging near a restaurant and he says that no one even seems to notice.

All of these things show that life under the Taliban was repressive and harsh.

mkcapen1's profile pic

mkcapen1 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

In the book "The Kite Runner" Rahim tells Amir about the changes that had occurred since the Taliban took over.  Initially Rahim thought that the community would have peace and he looked forward to the entrance of the Taliban. 

On issue of concern that was presented in the book was the ethnic cleansing of the Hazara, an ethnic population believed to have originated in Mongolia.  The Taliban went into the homes forcing the Hazara's into the streets and killed them without mercy.

The religious orders included the end of certain recreational activities including kite flying in Afghanistan.  However, many other recreational activities were also discontinued and the focus shifted to religious worship and prayer. 

Alcohol consumption became a crime.  Prior to the Taliban's presence men would partake alcohol in private places.  The book mentions Amir's father enjoying a good whiskey.  There are other times when he has a drink in his home with Rahim.

In the book Rahim talks about the destruction of beautiful buildings, the orphanages, and the rubble in the streets. 

As Amir goes to rescue Hassan's child there is a public stoning to punish a couple for committing adultery. 

mkcapen1's profile pic

mkcapen1 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

In the book "The Kite Runner" Rahim tells Amir about the changes that had occurred since the Taliban took over.  Initially Rahim thought that the community would have peace and he looked forward to the entrance of the Taliban. 

On issue of concern that was presented in the book was the ethnic cleansing of the Hazara, an ethnic population believed to have originated in Mongolia.  The Taliban went into the homes forcing the Hazara's into the streets and killed them without mercy.

The religious orders included the end of certain recreational activities including kite flying in Afghanistan.  However, many other recreational activities were also discontinued and the focus shifted to religious worship and prayer. 

Alcohol consumption became a crime.  Prior to the Taliban's presence men would partake alcohol in private places.  The book mentions Amir's father enjoying a good whiskey.  There are other times when he has a drink in his home with Rahim.

In the book Rahim talks about the destruction of beautiful buildings, the orphanages, and the rubble in the streets. 

As Amir goes to rescue Hassan's child there is a public stoning to punish a couple for committing adultery. 

 

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