In the novel Monster, what scenes depict Steve Harmon's humanity?

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Throughout the novel, Steve Harmon struggles to understand his identity after the prosecuting attorney, Sandra Petrocelli, calls him a monster. However, there are various scenes which portray Steve's humanity . Scenes that include Steve commenting on how he feels about life in jail and how he perceives himself depict his...

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Throughout the novel, Steve Harmon struggles to understand his identity after the prosecuting attorney, Sandra Petrocelli, calls him a monster. However, there are various scenes which portray Steve's humanity. Scenes that include Steve commenting on how he feels about life in jail and how he perceives himself depict his humanity. When one of the inmates comments that it is too late to put up a "holy front now," Steve says,

"In a way he was right, at least about me. I want to look like a good person. I want to feel like I'm a good person because I believe I am" (Myers 67).

Steve also displays his humanity in his interactions between family members. Steve comments that he wants to worry about how his mother is feeling, but he is too focused on his trial and current situation. Steve also wishes that he could play with his younger brother Jerry and earn his father's trust throughout the novel. Steve is also concerned about how his attorney views him. In a conversation with O'Brien, Steve mentions,

"I wanted to open my shirt and tell her to look into my heart to see who I really was, who the real Steve Harmon was" (Myers 97).

Steve is not just a callous individual with no conscience. He is a selfless person who cares deeply about those around him and is remorseful for his decision to participate in the robbery.

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