In the novel Bud, Not Buddy, why do you think the white people in the Hooverville won't accept help from others?

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In Chapter 8, Bud and Bugs visit a Hooverville while they are attempting to leave Flint. When they arrive, they notice that there are several fires that people are huddled around. Bud notices that a family of white people are huddled around a small fire by themselves. After Bud and...

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In Chapter 8, Bud and Bugs visit a Hooverville while they are attempting to leave Flint. When they arrive, they notice that there are several fires that people are huddled around. Bud notices that a family of white people are huddled around a small fire by themselves. After Bud and Deza are finished washing the dishes, they walk by the family of white people on their way to the main bonfire. Bud notices that the family's baby is coughing and that they look hungry and tired. Bud asks Deza why are they sitting alone by a small fire instead of by the large fire where the majority of the people are located. Deza says she feels sorry for the family and tells Bud that someone offered them food and blankets, but the man said, "Thank you very much, but we're white people. We ain't in need of a handout" (Curtis 77).

The reason the poor white family did not accept the help is because they are prejudiced towards black people. The novel takes place in the 1930s, a time when racial segregation was accepted and prejudiced views were commonplace. Despite being broke and ill, the racist white family still felt like they were "above" receiving help from black people.

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