In The Great Gatsby,  why does Fitzgerald use the words "hope" and "dreams" so often?

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The words "hope" and "dream(s)" are central to Fitzgerald's themes in The Great Gatsby. Jay Gatsby's undying hope is that he will one day reunite with his beloved Daisy; his dream is that he will prove to her that he is worthy of her love. Gatsby's hopes and dreams underpin his character development, from a lower class Midwesterner to a newly-wealthy New Yorker. His actions are all focused on achieving his dream of winning Daisy back. The two were not able to marry because she was of a much higher social class, and he believes if he can achieve her status through money and influence, he can have her, as well.

The novel is also a critique of the concept of the American Dream—the idea that if one works hard, he can earn whatever he desires. The novel suggests that Gatsby reaches his status through illegal activity, which already throws shade on a positive, pure reading of dream-fulfillment. Further, the novel can be described as a story of disillusionment, one in which characters 's dreams are...

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