Notes on the Odyssey Book Nine?This is what I have so far..... The goal that they are trying to achieve is Odysseus is trying to get back to Ithaca, and his son Telemachus is trying...

Notes on the Odyssey Book Nine?

This is what I have so far.....

  • The goal that they are trying to achieve is Odysseus is trying to get back to Ithaca, and his son Telemachus is trying to find his father.
  • Odysseus has many obstacles trying to achieve his goal, returning to Ithaca, such as Circe the goddess, and the Cyclops.
  • This experience changes them as individuals and/or a group because Odysseus is a great leader so he leads his men to victory, and he eventually gets back to Ithaca and his family.
  • Odysseus defeats the Cyclops by tricking it and stabbing it in the eye, and he outsmarts other people on his journey. His actions reveal about the kind of man or leader he is because on of his flaws is excessive pride and he is a great leader.
  • The connections I can make to myself, the world, or other texts, including films is that it shows how much people love there family, and how far they are willing to go to express that love and return to your loved ones. It also shows sacrifice and how one is willing to risk it all for the people they love.

Please Help!!! :)

Expert Answers
mstultz72 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Book IX focuses on the guest-host relationship.  Whereas the Greeks were extremely hospitable to strangers, the Cyclopes are not.  A Greek host is to feed and shelter a guest without even asking his name or allegiance, and--expecting this--Odysseus and his men make themselves right at home in Polyphemus' cave.  They help themselves to his cheese, fire, and wooly accomodations.  Their cultural naivete is a kind of hubris, as they see the world only through Greek eyes.  Granted, Polyphemus more than just a little inhospitable (eating some men), but the Greeks should not have been so presumptuous in their expectations.

Odysseus and his men also violate the laws of syphrosine (restraint and moderation in all things), according to the epos megan (the "golden mean").  Not only do the men excessively drink and eat in the cave, but Odysseus--after his revenge in blinding Polyphemus--pridefully boasts his name to the giant.  Calling himself "Odysseus" instead of "Nobody" shows his hubris and lack of syphrosine, both of which are a violation of the epos megan.  Polyphemus tells Neptune who is responsible for his blinding, and Odysseus and his men must suffer for many years as a result.

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The Odyssey

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