In writing an analytical essay on the question, "Should we read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn?", I am having trouble with where to put my argument and where not to put it. Should I present the...

In writing an analytical essay on the question, "Should we read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn?", I am having trouble with where to put my argument and where not to put it.

Should I present the reader with positives, and negatives inside thesis, and then give quotes from the book to support my views in the body paragraphs, and also should I tell the reader which side I'm supporting inside thesis?

Please Help.

Asked on by loler101

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e-martin | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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The thesis should clearly state your position. The function of a thesis statement in an essay like this one is to present the question/topic and your argument as concisely as possible.

In this case, including the counter-arguments in the thesis statement is no necessary. Including the fact that counter-arguments exist, however, may be appropriate. For example:

"One of the most popular successes in American literature, The Adventure of Huckleberry Finn is an essential part of the American canon, despite views to the contrary."

The opening paragraph of this essay should include a thesis that clearly states the topic and your position on that topic. Also, the introductory paragraph should provide a sense of what points and ideas the body of the essay will be exploring. 

In these body paragraphs, you should definitely include arguments on both sides, pro and con. 

Quotations from the novel can be included anywhere in the essay, even in the introduction and conclusion. However, to add substance to the arguments in the body paragraphs, some quotations should be used there. 

Sources:

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