Nora's leaving is brought about by her acheivement of individuationNorais forced into individuation. She must face her shadow and accept it before Torvald sees it and it is no longer private or...

Nora's leaving is brought about by her acheivement of individuation

Norais forced into individuation. She must face her shadow and accept it before Torvald sees it and it is no longer private or hidden. This is the “miracle” that occurs at the end: Nora, through her anima, confronts her shadow. She accepts it, sees that she did it out of love for Torvald, and she forgives herself. The problem with this, however, is that, for Torvald to forgive Nora, he must acknowledge his own shadow, because a deceitful or weak wife would not fit with his persona. When he fails to do this, Nora is a changed person, individuated, while Torvald is still the same, still a persona, merely a doll. At this point, Nora realizes  she is a changed person completely, she doesn’t know Torvald at all. She must leave, because she has reached individuation

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e-martin | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Another way to read the ending of this play is to see Nora's new-found strength as a necessary response to the realization that many (if not all) of her hopes for her marriage are dead. When Torvald refuses to act nobly and to protect Nora, the hope she once had of continuing to play the role of the demur wife is over. 

She cannot be the person in need of protection if there is no one to protect her. 

Nora played her part and allowed Torvald an opportunity to play his. If he had played his part as the protector, Nora could have continued to accept the viability of her own role as the passive wife. 

She has not necessarily achieved individuation - though she may have - but she certainly has decided that she cannot be true to her role if he will not be true to his. 

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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I have to agree with the centra idea as expressed in #1. There is a sense in which both Nora and Helmer have to accept certain truths about themselves that they have been ignoring or supressing for a very long time. The letter that Mrs. Linde chooses to allow Krongstad to send forces her to confront her own deceit and her own self, thus triggering a chain reaction in Helmer who must do the same. His inability to do so, however, clearly signals the end of their relationship.

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alisonjeaninelewis | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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I agree with Josh as well. I don't feel that Nora was forced to become an individual. Nora's shadow is the fact that she is too dependent on other people. When the whole situation with Krogstad happened, Nora couldn't turn to Torvald. Kristine helped her yes, but Kristine has been gone for ten years if Nora's life. She wasn't a main source of reliability like Torvald has been. When Torvald couldn't do anything to help, Nora has a reality check and from there Nora makes the choice to grow up.

I agree with you, Sarah. Nora matures the moment that she decides to defend herself against Torvald. Torvald wants their life to return to bliss, and happiness (in the most ignorant form) and the second she decided to refute that, and be honest, and express her concern for their lack of serious conversation over the years, she has matured. Children like to, not knowing any better, go back to everything being OK, because that is where they feel most comfortable. It takes a real mature adult to be able to admitt that there is a problem, and be brave enough to annouce the problem. In that moment, Nora grows up, and she is not forced or pressured into maturing at all. She finds her own independence, and gains it in a way that is clearly self-driven and desiring of more responsibility in her own life.

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jessdz | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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I believenora's shadow is her inner desire to be free from societies dogma of how a women should act. In Jung's theory of Individuation it says that it is a means of "self realization" so she does have to find her true identity. Her Anima would be a medium between her Persona, (childish self), and her shadow her desire to be free. Its obvious that Nora felt like Men were the only ones who pocessed freedom at that time. Her anima manifest itself through her small actions that allow the persona feel the presence of her shadow. Such actions as the macaroons and her defiance against Torvald rule, also how she mentioned to Dr. Rank that she was the one who gave Kristine the Job, and her desire to say "Damn" in front of everyone even though it was unheard of for a women to say such things. In the end Nora persona and shadow become too aware of eachother and Nora has to accept her desire and makes a rash but mature decision to leave, in order to find herself. Sorry it was lenghty and let it be known that I disagree with Nora's decison but thats what I understood as Jung's theory

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sarahkuhn24 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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I agree with Josh as well. I don't feel that Nora was forced to become an individual. Nora's shadow is the fact that she is too dependent on other people. When the whole situation with Krogstad happened, Nora couldn't turn to Torvald. Kristine helped her yes, but Kristine has been gone for ten years if Nora's life. She wasn't a main source of reliability like Torvald has been. When Torvald couldn't do anything to help, Nora has a reality check and from there Nora makes the choice to grow up.

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nvaniwaarden | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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I agree with Thrall. Nora does not know what it means to be self supportive, and Ibsen illustrates her childish qualities throughout the play. Even when Krogstad loans her money, she acts juvenile as Krogstad says to Nora, "Mrs. Helmer, it's quite clear you still haven't the faintest idea what it is you've committed," when he proves that she commits the act of fraud. It is clear that Nora is unable to take care of herself. Therefore, her epiphany towards the end is impairing, for she does not take into consideration the fact that she must provide for herself the second she leaves.

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lechuga3312 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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Nora's shadow is the individuality that she gets when she walks away from Torvald. Her dependence on everyone is her anima; she uses it to show that she's not a complete child, that she can do things on her own. That's whay she enjoys gloating about her loan to Kristine. It was something that she did on her own, without a "father" looking over her shoulder. Though Josh I agree that without figuring out how to accept blame for her own action she never will achieve her deepest desires, which I believe are to be a woman more like Kristine. I think her shadow wants to be able to live for themselves.

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jthrall | Student | eNotes Newbie

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I disagree. According to you, the shadow that Nora's anima was trying to bring to light the duration of the play was her desire to be an individual. This would mean that the anima could be her loan with Krogstad and the money trouble and her persona would then be the dollish way she interacts with everyone else in the play. However, while this may be true, there is a vital piece of Nora's shadow not being discussed: she needs other people.  Although she pretends to fawn over Torvald she never recongnizes her dependence upon him, as evident by the way she gossipes with Kristine. The truth is that she has never tried to make it on her own, but this is only due in part to her suppressed individuality. It is also due to her ability to manipulate.  Nora, through all of her manipulative tricks, needs to face the shadow of her relationship with Torvald, that she needs him to survive. Nora never reached individuation because she never recongnized that she cannot be a true individual until she changes her methods of manipulation.

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