Non-Fiction Suggestions for "Pygmalion"?Are there any good non-fiction readings related to Pygmalion or My Fair Lady? I want to incorporate non-fiction with literature reading.

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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You might want to conduct some research into accents and dialects and how they influence life chances. I am sure that you will find that accents and dialects that are associated with a particular social class or a particular working class region of the country are less favourably regarded by job interviewers and companies, especially if that job involves presenting yourself verbally, as in the media.

amy-lepore's profile pic

amy-lepore | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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I don't have any suggestions for you other than classroom studies about language acquisition, but I wanted to express my excitement for this topic.  I have never entertained the idea of non-fiction works to go along with this (there are lots of other fiction works that parallel the idea and pair with Pygmalion), so I am thrilled to "borrow" your idea for next year.  Thanks!

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clane | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

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You might think about teaching a non-fiction piece on the Pygmalion Effect with your students and seeing if they think it actually exists. It could be interesting for students because it kind of puts the teacher under the microscope and I'm certain you can find some recent news articles that support it. If you teach in California I know you can and if you don't, look up some news articles on the Internet. Robert Rosenthal and Lenore Jacobson have written several articles, done studies, and have a couple books out on the subject that are pretty good. One that I know of is Pygmalion in the Classroom: Teacher Expectation and Student Development. It could be an interesting look into the minds of students and teachers.

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sangrona | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

You might think about teaching a non-fiction piece on the Pygmalion Effect with your students and seeing if they think it actually exists. It could be interesting for students because it kind of puts the teacher under the microscope and I'm certain you can find some recent news articles that support it. If you teach in California I know you can and if you don't, look up some news articles on the Internet. Robert Rosenthal and Lenore Jacobson have written several articles, done studies, and have a couple books out on the subject that are pretty good. One that I know of is Pygmalion in the Classroom: Teacher Expectation and Student Development. It could be an interesting look into the minds of students and teachers.

yes i do work in cali....i saw some articles on that so i guess ill go ahead with them. thank you very much for your reply.

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