In Night, summarize the story Moishe the Beadle told Wiesel on his return from being deported. Why did he say he returned to Sighet?

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Moishe the Beadle, who is a foreign Jew, is expelled from Sighet (which is in Hungary) and sent to Poland. There, the Gestapo takes over his train and orders Jews to get off and board trucks. They are taken to woods near the Galician forest and told to get out...

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Moishe the Beadle, who is a foreign Jew, is expelled from Sighet (which is in Hungary) and sent to Poland. There, the Gestapo takes over his train and orders Jews to get off and board trucks. They are taken to woods near the Galician forest and told to get out of the trucks and dig deep trenches. Then the Gestapo soldiers order each person to approach the trenches and bear his or her neck, and each person is shot. Babies are tossed into the air and used for target practice. Moishe is able to escape because he was shot in the leg and believed to be dead. 

Moishe returns to Sighet to warn the community of the fate that awaits them so that they can prepare. He says, "I wanted to return to Sighet to describe to you my death so that you might ready yourselves while there is still time" (page 7). However, no one in Sighet believes him, and they think he is insane. They do not heed his warning.

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Moshe the Beadle believes that he has returned to Sighet to warn the townspeople of the Nazi threat.

Moshe's story starts with being expelled from Sighet.  When he returns, Moshe talks to anyone who will listen his story.  His story consists of how Jewish people like himself were ordered to dig trenches.  Then, one by one, the Nazis killed them.  The Nazis used infants as target practice.  Moshe hid amongst the dead bodies, and pretended he was dead. He believed that he was chosen to live so he could warn others of his experience. 

However, when the people of Sighet heard his story, they refused to believe him.  Some said that Moshe made up the story because he wanted pity. Others claimed that he had "gone mad" or that Moshe wanted money.  Moshe ends weeping because he is not believed and leaves Sighet once and for all.

Wiesel uses the story of Moshe the Beadle to show how dehumanization was a significant aspect of the Holocaust.  The Nazis dehumanized their victims, and, in turn, Wiesel suggests that some of the victims dehumanized one another. In the presentation of Moshe's story, Wiesel argues that the Holocaust is the net result of human cruelty towards one another.  

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