In Night by Elie Wiesel, how did Elie's father respond when he learned his name had been written down?  

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In chapter 5, Elie and his father initially believe they have both have passed the first selection. A few days later, the Blockälteste announces that he has been given a list of numbers and those called need to report for a second selection. Elie then sees his father running towards...

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In chapter 5, Elie and his father initially believe they have both have passed the first selection. A few days later, the Blockälteste announces that he has been given a list of numbers and those called need to report for a second selection. Elie then sees his father running towards him with a worried look on his face. Elie's father says that his number has been called and he will have to participate in the second selection. In one of the most moving scenes of the novel, Elie mentions that his father began to speak rapidly and run out of breath as he attempted to say goodbye to his son for what he thought was the last time. Elie's father has desperate look on his face and begins confusing his words as speaks to his son. Elie's father then gives his son a knife and spoon before leaving for the second selection. When Elie receives the knife and spoon from his father, he remembers thinking that those two items were his entire inheritance. After Elie's father leaves for the second selection, Elie wanders around in a daze at work. Later that evening, Elie is relieved to reunite with his father, who survived the second selection process.

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In Night by Elie Wiesel, Elie's father learns that his name has been written down for selection. His first reaction is to reassure his son, Elie. He tells him that nothing is for sure and that there is still hope. He believes it is possible he will be given a reprieve, or at least that is what he tells Elie. However, as the time for Elie to go to work comes closer, his father begins to speak quickly. 

"He would have liked to say so many things. His speech grew confused; his voice choked. He knew that I would have to go in a few moments. He would have to stay behind alone, so very alone" (Wiesel 71).

Before Elie can leave, his father gives him his knife and spoon. Elie calls it "the inheritance" (Wiesel 71). Elie, at first, refuses to take it, but his father pleads with him, and finally, he does. 

When Elie gets back to camp that night, he is surprised and pleased to see that his father is still there.

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