In Night by Elie Wiesel, why did Elie's father refuse to sell everything and move to Palestine?

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During the spring of 1944, the Red Army (meaning the Soviets) was on the march, and the Jews of Sighet, including Elie and his family, believe that the Nazis will be unable to annihilate the Jews. Even that late in World War II, Jews could buy emigration certificates to Palestine, and Elie begs his father to do so. He wants his father to sell everything and liquidate his business so that the family can move to Palestine. However, his father refuses to do so because he says that he is too old and cannot start over again. Elie's father is set in his ways and frightened to start his life over again in a faraway land that he does not understand. Shortly afterward, Fascists seize control of the Hungarian government and Nazis enter the country with the government's permission. 

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Elie's father, in Night by Elie Wiesel, was like most people during WWII. He did not believe he and his family would be touched by the Holocaust. Besides, Sighet was his home, and he didn't want to leave. Nobody had any idea how bad things were going to get. Nothing remotely similar had happened to them, personally, before. Mr. Wiesel thought the events of the war would pass them by, and that they would be safe. When Elie finally asked his father to sell out the family business and emigrate to Palestine, Mr. Wiesel's response was that he was too old. He didn't feel that he could start all over somewhere far away at his age. Besides, the news was that the Russians were advancing and Hitler's defeat was imminent. Mr. Wiesel, like so many others, thought they were safe.

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