At the end of The Great Gatsby, how does Nick see Gatsby?

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In the first chapter of The Great Gatsby, Nick states, "Gatsby turned out all right at the end," and on the last day he sees him, Nick thinks "I disapproved of him from beginning to end." It is safe to say that Nick has conflicting feelings about Gatsby....

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In the first chapter of The Great Gatsby, Nick states, "Gatsby turned out all right at the end," and on the last day he sees him, Nick thinks "I disapproved of him from beginning to end." It is safe to say that Nick has conflicting feelings about Gatsby. He has admiration for a man who pulled himself out of poverty and obscurity in the Midwest, a man who amasses extraordinary wealth, but that admiration is tempered by the knowledge that Gatsby resorted to criminal behavior to make his fortune.

It is also safe to say that Nick sees Gatsby as a sympathetic character. Nick understands that Gatsby is too naive to understand that wealth alone is not enough to offer Daisy. The manner in which Gatsby makes his money is a problem for her, and she is open with her dismay of the way that Gatsby flaunts his wealth after she attends one of his parties. Nick sees Gatsby's blind spot, and he feels sorry for him. Nick is also heartened by Gatsby's courage in standing up to Tom Buchanan in the Plaza Hotel showdown. Nick tells readers, "I wanted to get up and slap him on the back" when Gatsby clarifies for Tom how he was able to attend Oxford after the war.

Perhaps better than any of his words, Nick's actions clearly communicate his feelings for Gatsby after his murder. Nick perseveres in the face of the fear and apathy that keep others from Gatsby's funeral, and he is compassionate toward Gatsby's father. In the end, Nick is accepting of who Gatsby was.

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At the end of the novel Nick has had his illusions of the East Egg shattered, and when he sees Gatsby for the last time, he realizes that Gatsby is a more honest man than the others, despite his white lies, and tells him:

"They're a rotten crowd," I shouted across the lawn. "You're worth the whole damn bunch put together."

I've always been glad I said that. It was the only compliment I ever gave him, because I disapproved of him from beginning to end. First he nodded politely, and then his face broke into that radiant and understanding smile, as if we'd been in ecstatic cahoots on that fact all the time.
(Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, mrbye.com)

Nick comes to appreciate Gatsby's emotional purpose, his actions in pursuit of a clear goal, versus the shallow lives of the other residents in the East Egg. Even Nick's own cousin, Daisy, is barely able to muster an honest response to either Gatsby's declaration of love or to the accidental death of Myrtle. Nick can see that despite the pretensions of high-class by the East Egg, they are barely more than children with money, while Gatsby has worked hard for his goal, only to have it removed by jealousy and spite. Gatsby, therefore, is "worth the whole damn bunch" because of his inherent moral integrity.

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