Negative thinkingNegative thinking may be useful? I wonder...

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litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Yes, negative thinking can be useful as long as positive thinking is also there. Negative thinking can be helpful because if you don't think of anything negative, then you will not always be realistic. If you find something negative, you have a chance to fix it.
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ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

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While Professor Forgas I’m sure is an expert in his field, I would suggest that you research what brain research has to show about the power of positive thinking. The classes in which I have studied brain research have shown a definite link to a person’s positive thoughts and their level or willingness to experience success. Positive thinking does not mean “gullible” or “easily convinced”. It means that one tries to find the benefit out of any given situation. That does not necessarily equate with cheerfulness. When my mother died, I used positive thinking in expressing that she was no longer in pain. This helped me deal with the sorrow and my relationships in a much healthier way than being negative.

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marbar57 | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted on

Hmmm. In a way, negative thinking could be quite useful, if you think of it in the right way. I know some people who believe far too many things they should question more closely. Email rumors, superstitions, shoddy pseudoscience....I end up visiting Snopes.com at least once a week, it seems, just to prove to someone that some ridiculous thing they have heard is not true. And without skeptics, who could very well have been thought of as "negative", we might still think disease is caused by bad humors, and that the sun orbits the earth.

  You know, you've got a valid point there!  But are skeptics really negative people, or are they just people who don't go along with everybody else?  To question isn't necessarily negativity?  In all, it was a good post.

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lynn30k | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

Hmmm. In a way, negative thinking could be quite useful, if you think of it in the right way. I know some people who believe far too many things they should question more closely. Email rumors, superstitions, shoddy pseudoscience....I end up visiting Snopes.com at least once a week, it seems, just to prove to someone that some ridiculous thing they have heard is not true. And without skeptics, who could very well have been thought of as "negative", we might still think disease is caused by bad humors, and that the sun orbits the earth.

marbar57's profile pic

marbar57 | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted on

I'm of the opinion that negativity has never produced anything useful except lightning and electricity! 

Negativity stifles the emotions, smothers creativity, causes despair, and creates a permanent bad attitude.  Negative people just aren't pleasant to be around because they poison everybody else. 

If you really want to be useful, try thinking positively!  You'll get far better results that way.

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lrwilliams | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

I suppose if you look at negative thinking as looking at all sides of a problem or as simply playing the "Devil's Advocate" then it could be thought of as useful. However the process of going around always thinking the worse about things would not be useful.

giorgiana1976's profile pic

giorgiana1976 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

A study coordinated by Professor Joseph Forgas, from the University of New South Wales in Sydney showed that
pessimistic people are less credule and they can better judge others, having also a better memory because they are more attentive to what surrounds them than happier people who tend to believe everything they are told.

It was found that bad mood people were less likely willing to believe in urban myths presented.

The survey also showed that sad people are more able to sustain a plea in writing, with reasons. According to Forgas, a bad mood could promote a better adapted communication style.

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