I need to write a lab about the following equations. I'm really, really having trouble with Magnesium and Silver Nitrate. I've searched the internet for help with observations and practically...

I need to write a lab about the following equations. I'm really, really having trouble with Magnesium and Silver Nitrate. I've searched the internet for help with observations and practically everything. I need, need, need need need your help! I honestly don't know what to do. I need to have observations on each one of these (I have them, but I don't know what to do with them) and be able to explain why that thing bubbled or why that one smelled or why something burned... etc. 

Magnesium and hydrochloric acid

Mg (s) + 2HCl (aq) à H2 (g) + MgCl2 (aq)

Magnesium and silver nitrate

Mg (s) + 2AgNO3 (aq) à2Ag (s) + Mg(NO3)2

Silver nitrate and sodium chloride

AgNO3 (aq)+ NaCl (aq) à AgCl (s) + NaNo3

Sodium hydroxide and iron (III) nitrate

NaOH (aq) + Fe(NO3)3 (aq)àFe(OH)3 (s) + 3NaNO3 (aq)

Sodium bicarbonate decomposition

2 NaHCO3(s) à CO2(g) + H2O(g) + Na2CO3(s)

Sodium hydroxide and cobalt (III) chloride

CoCl3 (s) + NaOH (aq)  à Co(OH)3 + 3NaCl

Lead nitrate and potassium iodide

Pb(NO3)2 (aq) + 2KI (aq) à 2KNO3 (aq) + PbI2 (s)

Isopropyl alcohol and oxygen

2C3H8O (aq) + 9O2 (g)à 6CO2 (g)+ 8H2O (aq)

Asked on by srenard

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ncchemist | eNotes Employee

Posted on

I'll go through what is observed as a result of each chemical reaction.

1.  Mg + 2HCl to H2 + MgCl2:  You will notice the solid Mg metal disappearing as it is consumed.  The hydrogen gas will bubble out of solution.  If you hold a flame above the reaction liquid, the hydrogen gas will ignite and burn.

2.  Mg + 2AgNO3 to 2Ag + Mg(NO3)2:  This is simply switching one metal for another.  The solid Mg metal will be consumed and metallic silver (Ag) will appear instead.  Actually, the silver will probably deposit on top of the exposed Mg in the solution as a type of electroplating until all of the Mg is covered with silver, thus stopping the reaction.

3.  AgNO3 + NaCl to AgCl + NaNO3:  The AgNO3 and NaCl are both very water soluble so you will start with a clear solution.  The AgCl produced is insoluble in water, and this white solid will precipitate from solution as it forms.

4. 3NaOH + Fe(NO3)3 to Fe(OH)3 + 3NaNO3:  Both NaOH and Fe(NO3)3 are water soluble.  Fe(OH)3 is a form of rust and is insoluble in water.  As the reaction proceeds, a deep red/orange colored solid will precipitate.

5. 2NaHCO3 to CO2 + H2O + Na2CO3:  At high temperatures, sodium bicarbonate will decompose to produce two gasses, CO2 and water vapor.  A solid (Na2CO3) will remain behind, the CO2 is invisible, but the water vapor should appear as stream emanating from the solid.

6: CoCl3 + NaOH to Co(OH)3 + 3NaCl:  CoCl3 is soluble in water and will give a deep colored solution.  Co(OH)3 is a blue colored solid that is insoluble in water and will precipitate.

7: Pb(NO3)2 + 2KI to 2KNO3 + PbI2:  Both Pb(NO3)2 and KI are soluble in water.  KNO3 is also soluble in water but PbI2 is not very water soluble.  So a vibrant yellow solid (PbI2) will precipitate from a clear solution.

8: 2C3H8O + 9O2 to 6CO2 + 8H2O:  This is basically completely oxidizing a solution of isopropanol with gaseous oxygen into CO2 and H2O.  The isopropanol is mixed with an oxygenated sample of water.  The CO2 will bubble out of solution as the gas is formed.

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