The Fall of the House of Usher Questions and Answers
by Edgar Allan Poe

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How does Roderick Usher compare to his house?

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Roderick Usher and his family house in Poe's "The Fall of the House of Usher" are similar because they are both decrepit and isolated; their fates also merge at the end of the story.

Roderick Usher is an old friend of the narrator of Poe's story, and at the start of the tale, Roderick has asked the narrator to come visit him at the Usher manor. As the narrator approaches, we are given a very detailed description of the house and its surroundings, which greatly adds to the ominous mood of the story. The house is described as "melancholy" and the narrator is immediately overcome with "a sense of insufferable gloom" as he observes the manor from a short distance. When the narrator enters the house and sees Roderick (for the first time in years), he is shocked by the man's appearance. When he first sees, Roderick, the narrator explains,

It was with difficulty that I could bring myself to admit the identity of the wan being before me with the companion of my early boyhood. Yet the character of...

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