I need tips on writing a monologue for Scout.A short monologue on Scout from the novel ''To Kill a Mockingbird.  I must clearly develop the unique personality, value system, and speech patterns of...

I need tips on writing a monologue for Scout.

A short monologue on Scout from the novel ''To Kill a Mockingbird.  I must clearly develop the unique personality, value system, and speech patterns of one particular character from the novel, if you can't answer the first half of the question... At least can you please refresh my mind, and tell me some IMPORTANT incident, events, etc. that happened in the book concerning Scout.

Asked on by sarabbb

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clairewait | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I realize you could likely do almost anything you want for this assignment.  In order to fully capture Scout's humor, innocence, and wisdom-beyond-her-years, I would choose a scene and write the monologue as if she is retelling the events to Atticus.

One scene that could be fun is the night of the fire, when she is with Jem and Dill at the Radley's house, settling a bet.  Given her description at the end of Chapter 6, it could be argued that this was one of the most frightening moments of Scout's life.

I advise you to reread chapter 6 and try to get a feel of the scene from Scout's perspective.  Then, without looking, try to write down what you remember as though you are only 6 or 7 years old.  Then go back to the book and see what you have left out.

Young children often tell stories that do not come out in perfect chronological order.  Think of how future details in the story remind them of things they left out.  This could certainly be part of your technique.  The entire scene is not long, but if you included lots of description in addition to the action, I think you could easily recreate the moment and sufficiently portray Scout's character.

Be sure to maintain a serious attitude throughout.  Perhaps pretend Atticus has found out about the event and is questioning the children separately as to what happened.  If this is your approach, you might also want to consider the way Scout thinks and acts very practically when it comes to getting in trouble.  It is almost as if she can convince herself (as well as her audience) that she was not doing the wrong thing because there is a completely reasonable explanation for her actions.

Sounds like a fun assignment.  Good luck.

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