I need a thesis statement for Macbeth regarding Conservative Beliefs. Here is the prompt: Choose a specific character examine their dialogue, acting, descriptions. How does their trajectory support...

I need a thesis statement for Macbeth regarding Conservative Beliefs. Here is the prompt: Choose a specific character examine their dialogue, acting, descriptions. How does their trajectory support that violations of archetypes will lead to social and moral chaos.

Expert Answers
Chase Burns eNotes educator| Certified Educator

This is a great writing prompt! Before examining Macbeth's dialogue and actions, we should look at the specific type of archetype that Macbeth embodies, as well as the archetype he murders. 

In Macbeth, Macbeth begins the play representing the ideal knight, warrior or fighter. He is described as a man who can tear another man clean in two, and he is well admired by his peers. Loyal to his country, Macbeth is respected by nearly all of his kinsmen. Duncan, the other archetype who is important to note, is a fine example of a good king. Similarly to Macbeth, Duncan is well-liked by his people and peers. He is patient and thoughtful, only acting when it is necessary. 

It can be claimed that it is the destruction of these archetypes that creates so much turmoil within Macbeth. The death and destruction would not have occurred if Macbeth would have been content within his archetype. However, Macbeth is not content. Rather, he has vaulting ambition. This ambition is routinely mentioned in the play. 

MACBETH 

I have no spur /To prick the sides of my intent, but only / Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself / And falls on the other— (1.7.25-28)

In regards to a thesis, one possible working thesis could be: Macbeth, initially a man who appears as the archetype of the good knight, is moved too strongly by his vaulting ambition, resulting in an overthrow of Duncan, who represents the archetype of the king. Macbeth's denial of his destined place and position is the source of the violence and destruction within the play.