I need as many quotes as possible that show/refer to the "dangerous/forbidden knowledge" in Frankenstein.

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From an early age, VictorFrankenstein is attracted by the allure not of science but of alchemy, with its forbidden fruits and promises or dreams of omnipotence. For instance, when he arrives at his university, he is disappointed that his researches into alchemy are pooh-poohed, stating:

I had a contempt...

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From an early age, Victor Frankenstein is attracted by the allure not of science but of alchemy, with its forbidden fruits and promises or dreams of omnipotence. For instance, when he arrives at his university, he is disappointed that his researches into alchemy are pooh-poohed, stating:

I had a contempt for the uses of modern natural philosophy. It was very different when the masters of the science sought immortality and power; such views, although futile, were grand ...

He wants not science but grandeur and glory, by whatever means it takes.

Earlier, when Victor is disgusted by a natural scientist explaining the workings lightening that felled an oak tree, he is briefly snatched from the addictive and obsessive grasp of his desire to use the forbidden knowledge of alchemy to achieve power, positing his desire as nothing less than a struggle between the forces of good and the forces of evil. He describes his turn from science as the work of a guardian angel:

... the last effort made by the spirit of preservation to avert the storm that was even then hanging in the stars and ready to envelop me. Her victory was announced by an unusual tranquillity and gladness of soul which followed the relinquishing of my ancient and latterly tormenting studies. It was thus that I was to be taught to associate evil with their prosecution, happiness with their disregard.

It was a strong effort of the spirit of good, but it was ineffectual. Destiny was too potent, and her immutable laws had decreed my utter and terrible destruction.

We can see in the above quote Victor's recognition of the evil allure of his "tormenting" quest for knowledge, as well as his attempts to rationalize his fall into temptation as "destiny," when, of course, it was his own decision.

Though he has long been repelled by modern science, both the university and M. Krempe again lure him along the path of forbidden fruit. A science lecture converts him and fills him with unlimited ambitions and longings to achieve heights never before reached through "natural" science:

So much has been done, exclaimed the soul of Frankenstein—more, far more, will I achieve; treading in the steps already marked, I will pioneer a new way, explore unknown powers, and unfold to the world the deepest mysteries of creation.

Victor is aware of the moral dangers of what he is stepping into but doesn't understand their full implications until he has created life from inanimate parts. Ambition and desire drive him. The unhealthiness of his pursuit is exemplified by his isolation and increasing ill health as his life loses all sense of balance and proportion in pursuit of a dark goal.

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Another quotation that illustrates this theme can be found when Frankenstein warns Robert Walton of the dangers of acquiring false knowledge:

Learn from me…how dangerous is the acquirement of knowledge and how much happier that man is who believes his native town to be the world, than he who aspires to become greater than his nature will allow.

The story that Frankenstein proceeds to tell Robert stands as a stark illustration of intellectual hubris, of what can happen when a man, a mere mortal, starts acting like God.

What Victor is driving at in this quotation is that man should be content with his nature, that he shouldn't try to become something he isn't. That was Victor's biggest mistake. He was so puffed up with pride and overweening vanity, so utterly convinced in his scientific genius, that he thought himself capable of taking on the mantle of God the creator. In doing so, he exceeded the bounds of his nature, with truly catastrophic results.

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There are many quotes (in Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein) which refer to the dangerousness or forbidden nature of Victor's pursuit of knowledge.

The first quote appears in Chapter Two. Here, Victor is admitting that the knowledge he seeks ("the secrets of heaven and earth") are ones which should not necessarily be looked for. By simply using the word "secret" Victor is admitting that the knowledge he is seeking is forbidden.

It was the secrets of heaven and earth that I desired to learn; and whether it was the outward substance of things, or the inner spirit of nature and the mysterious soul of man that occupied me, still my inquiries were directed to the metaphysical, or, in it highest sense, the physical secrets of the world.

Later in Chapter Two, Victor again speaks about the secrets of nature and his desire to uncover them. (As stated before, Victor's quest to dissolve the "secrets" stands as dealing with the forbidden knowledge.)

I have described myself as always having been embued with a fervent longing to penetrate the secrets of nature.

One last quote from Chapter Two offers another example of why the knowledge Victor was seeking could be considered forbidden or dangerous.

The raising of ghosts or devils was a promise liberally accorded by my favourite authors, the fulfillment of which I most eagerly sought; and if my incantations were always unsuccessful, I attributed the failure rather to my own inexperience and mistake than to a want of skill or fidelity in my instructors.

Once again, the reference of dealing with "things" which should be left alone ("raising of ghosts or devils") would normally make one consider what they were doing and the kind of knowledge they were seeking. Unfortunately for Victor, his desires become obsessive and he fails to see any type of quest for knowledge as forbidden or dangerous.

One last and final quote that speaks to the forbidden and dangerous pursuit of knowledge is found in Chapter Three. Victor, at school in Ingolstadt, finds himself desiring the greatest of all knowledge. He, unhappy with what has already been discovered, wishes to (basically) find out all of the scientific mysteries on earth.

So much has been done, exclaimed the soul of Frankenstein—more, far more, will I achieve: treading in the steps already marked, I will pioneer a new way, explore unknown powers, and unfold to the world the deepest mysteries of creation.

Basically, Victor does not recognize that some secrets are meant to stay buried.

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