I need to know and describe the figures of speech in this poem. Please help im desperate and I dont understand poetry.  The gaudy tapestry of June suddenly quickens: bees drumming gregorian...

I need to know and describe the figures of speech in this poem. Please help im desperate and I dont understand poetry.

 

The gaudy tapestry of June

suddenly quickens:

bees drumming gregorian

lilacs swinging censers

In my middle age Ive stepped

into the medievel world

Christ`s body nailed to every tree

his blood emblazoning the rose

the air`s a whir with angels

Shhh, Shhh says the srinkler

calling me to silence

the only other sound

the crack of roots thirsting

My body tightens with the dandelion

tug of white hairs

about to explode

Everywhere hints fo what comes next

like the family stories

The mist that rose from Grandfathers chest

when his eyes iced over

Aunt Sudie dragging Maudie

with her to the grave

M own journey

out of this wrecked body

pulled by the weight of bones

and upward gravity

The other world will not let go

Vaughan, Trahern, Ammons, Wright

have made me a visitor to earth

thier words crowding my head like angels poised on a pin

Asked on by marine20

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davidwheeler's profile pic

davidwheeler | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

Posted on

There are other figuresof speech here apart from personification and metaphor. There is onomatopoiea: drumming, whirr, ssh ssh, c; alliteration - poised on a pin, swinging censers; parallelism - wrecked body/weight of bones. Remember there are a whole range of figures of speech that are to do with the sound of the words.

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jk180's profile pic

James Kelley | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

Two figures of speech that stand out for me with this poem are metaphor and personfication.

The metaphors seem generally pretty short, as in the opening line "The gaudy tapestry of June." The month of June doesn't literally have a tapestry, so this statement is clearly an example of figurative speech. I think this metaphor might bring to mind all of the colors of flowers that tend to be in full bloom in June.

Personification is used much more extensively in the poem. There's a string of instances, all tied to the idea of created a sense of a medieval world: "bees drumming gregorian" likens the insects' noises to the chanting of monks, and "lilacs swinging censers" likens the flowers to attendants at a Catholic mass who lightly swing an incense-filled ball on a chain in order to waft the scent of incense across the room.

As I reread the poem, I see the "gaudy tapestry of June" as more than just a reference to colorful flowers. The whole tapestry "quickens," we're told; it comes to life. "Tapestry" is probably being used here in a broader, also metaphoric sense: the speaker seems to be reflecting on the interwoven fabric of life.

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