I need help with writing my essay for 1984 on disenfranchisement.I'm writing an essay on the book 1984, and I chose to do it on disenfranchisement - no power to create a change in society which...

I need help with writing my essay for 1984 on disenfranchisement.

I'm writing an essay on the book 1984, and I chose to do it on disenfranchisement - no power to create a change in society which leads to alienation of Winston. I need help with the three body paragraphs and proof, quotes which prove my topic.

Asked on by jessica35

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mstultz72 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Winston is deprived of nearly every right, privilege, and freedom imaginable.  Here's a rough outline:

Main Topic: Political/Legal disenfranchisement

I. Denied right to privacy (Freedom from search and seizure)

Any sound that Winston made, above the level of a very low whisper, would be picked up by it, moreover, so long as he remained within the field of vision which the metal plaque commanded, he could be seen as well as heard. There was of course no way of knowing whether you were being watched at any given moment. How often, or on what system, the Thought Police plugged in on any individual wire was guesswork. It was even conceivable that they watched everybody all the time.

II. Denied Freedom of speech

The thing that he was about to do was to open a diary. This was not illegal (nothing was illegal, since there were no longer any laws), but if detected it was reasonably certain that it would be punished by death, or at least by twenty-five years in a forced-labour camp...To mark the paper was the decisive act.

III.  Denied Right to a fair and speedy trial; legal representation; freedom from torture

There was a long range of crimes -- espionage, sabotage, and the like -- to which everyone had to confess as a matter of course. The confession was a formality, though the torture was real. How many times he had been beaten, how long the beatings had continued, he could not remember. Always there were five or six men in black uniforms at him simultaneously...There were times when his nerve so forsook him that he began shouting for mercy even before the beating began, when the mere sight of a fist drawn back for a blow was enough to make him pour forth a confession of real and imaginary crimes.

 

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