I need help with my son's homework.  I need to find 1 metaphor and 2 similies in the Wednesday Wars book.  Can anyone help fast?  I am stuck!

Asked on by stig

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pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Similes compare two things using the word "like." In other words "the lights twinkled like stars" is a simile.

On page 4 of the book, the look comes over the teacher's face "like the sun had winked out..."   That's a smile.

Page 8 -- asking your sister... is like asking Nova Scotia...  That's a simile too.  Both of those use the word "like" to compare two things...


Metaphors also compare one thing to another, but don't have "like" or "as" in them. So the idea of your "mind's eye" is a metaphor. Metaphors are also used in sentences like "his attempts were just a drop in the ocean..."

One example of a metaphor comes in the first sentence of the book where the teacher hates him with "heat whiter than the sun."  This metaphor compares her hate to the sun.

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poetrymfa | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

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The Wednesday Wars is a young adult novel by Gary D. Schmidt which follows the story of Holling Hoodhood, a seventh grader who finds himself trapped in the shadow of his father while dealing with two major problems: 1) the looming shadow of the Vietnam War and the turbulence of the world around him, and 2) the trials and tribulations of being a boy in search of his own identity.

One metaphor that occurs in the book is used to describe Holling's reverence for Mickey Mantle after learning of his death:

When gods die, they die hard. 

Holling is comparing Mantle to a god, even though he was a mere mortal.

There are also plenty of similes to be found in this book. Holding compares his experience of being pressured by his classmates to bring them cream puffs to the troubles of Antonio in The Merchant of Venice:

I remembered the death threats hanging over me like Shylock's knife hanging over Antonio's chest.

When Holling hands in a test five minutes prior to the end of the day, his teacher decides to correct it in front of him. Holling describes this with another simile:

"Stand here and we'll see how you've done," she said, which is sort of like a dentist handing you a mirror and saying, "Sit here and watch while I drill a hole in your tooth.” 

gatortator's profile pic

gatortator | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted on

Excuse me pohnpei397, but what would be the effect the author created on Page 4's simile?

What would be a metaphor from the book, and the effect the author created on it?

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