I need help with a Lord of the Flies paired perspective poem .paired perspective poem- a poem in which you reveal the inner thoughts from a point of view of two different characters who are...

I need help with a Lord of the Flies paired perspective poem .

paired perspective poem- a poem in which you reveal the inner thoughts from a point of view of two different characters who are experiencing the same event .

I have to do one with Lord of the Flies. i was planning on using Ralph and one of the hunters ( from Jack's tribe) in the poem but im having writers block. i need 20 lines (ten from Ralph and ten from the hunter) . in the poem I was thinking about the circle the boys make with the dancing that Jack and the other boys were doing and Ralph walked and saw them ( right before Simon gets killed)

Asked on by melmel654

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litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Try beginning by making a word map for each character.  In the map, list traits of the character.  Use physical and mental traits.  Then think of anything else you can add.  You can use these raw words to build your poem, plugging them in where they are needed.

mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Regarding your idea, could you not extract some of the lines from the novel that describe the boys' thoughts?  For instance, as Ralph and Piggy notice Jack wielding his spear in a tone that "conveyed a warning, given out of the pride of ownership."  Ralph notices the fire, wondering how the flames are visible.  "Evening was come, not with calm beauty but with the threat of violence."

In this section of the novel, there is the challenge of Jack for dominance.  He tells the boys that he has given them food and claims that his hunters will protect them. "Who will join my tribe?"

Ralph turns crimson and says, "I'm chief ....and we're going to keep the fire going.

In this scene there is the vying for power of Ralph and Jack that lends itself well to a paired perspective.  After all, Golding already has started it.

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Another idea that comes to mind is to write the perspective poem about the beast from the points of view of Simon and Jack.  As you remember, Jack and the hunters impaled the head of the pig that they had killed upon a stake and stuck it in the ground.  As the head sits and drips blood, flies form around it, causing it to resemble Beelzebub.  As Simon stumbles upon it, his gaze is held "by that ancient, inescapable recognition."  It talks to Simon, telling him "You knew, didn't you? I'm part of you?"  Simon recognizes the evil that is inherent in me; an evil that makes his head wobble. 

While Simon passes out and then, revived, returns to try to explain to the boys what the beast is, Jack and the hunters worship it.  Having become savage, they wear masks, hunt, and beat upon others who do not follow them. Surely, Jack's dialogue with the head of the pig differs from that of Simon.

 

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