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To add additional information, choice b--glass is not really a solid because it does not have the specific lattice pattern that is a characteristic of solids. Such noncrystalline solids have some characteristics of solids and some characteristics of liquids, which are identifiable under the microscope.

In a solid, the atoms...

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To add additional information, choice b--glass is not really a solid because it does not have the specific lattice pattern that is a characteristic of solids. Such noncrystalline solids have some characteristics of solids and some characteristics of liquids, which are identifiable under the microscope.

In a solid, the atoms are in an organized pattern, a lattice pattern, which causes a solid to keep its shape. In a liquid, the atoms don't have an organized atomic lattice structure, and the atoms move about more freely, albeit microscopically slowly, exhibiting the properties of a liquid. Glass does have properties of a liquid because its atoms can move about but still too slowly to see the shape of the glass change.

There is atomic order in glass of a noncrystalline nature, not structured as a crystalline lattice as found in solids, like salt, for example, in which the atoms form a crystalline pattern. The atoms in glass aare less ordered than those in a solid, but not as disorganized as in a liquid. The term amorphous is used to describe glass. When glass is manufactured, it is cooled and its atomic motion has slowed significantly enough to produce its almost solid state.

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A liquid is a state of matter where the molecules of the substance have enough freedom from each other that they may move around.  The molecules have enough freedom of movement, "they take the shape of the container they are in."  Of the examples listed in your question, "the paint in the can being brushed onto a wall" (answer C) fits the definition.

Answer A fits the definition of a gas, where the molecules have so much freedom, they are far apart from each other.  Smoke drifting in air, which itself is a collection of gases, fits the definition of a gas.

Answers B and D both fit the definition of a solid.  The molecules of a solid have little freedom of movement.  They are in some repeating pattern of rigid assortment, which is what makes them solid.

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