I need help finding a poem and analyzing it.Analysis could include poem's literal and figurative meanings/themes, poetic devices used and other relevent info. Analysis has to be depth. The poem...

I need help finding a poem and analyzing it.

Analysis could include poem's literal and figurative meanings/themes, poetic devices used and other relevent info.

Analysis has to be depth. The poem types can be haikus, limericks, free verse, blank verse, sonnets or rhyming couplets or etc...The poems can be on any topic.

Asked on by r-m123

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literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Given that you do not provide a specific poem, I am assuming that you are allowed to choose any poem and simply dissect it completely. So that you can see how to properly do this, I am going to show you the process of analyzing a poem completely.

The poem "The Night of the Scorpion" by Nissim Ezekiel is a very easy poem to analyze- both in regards to imagery, poetic devices, and meaning.

First, the imagery in the poem is used to excite fear and anxiety in the reader; as well as, detail the fear and anxiety which Ezekiel himself felt given he is recalling his experience when his mother was stung by a scorpion. The words used to develop a heavily image ridden poem are: steady rain, poison, flash of diabolic tail, dark room, swarms of flies,sins, and burned away.

The poetic devices used within the poem are:

Alliteration- "parting with his poison" (repetition of consonant sound in a line of poetry.

Repetition- The use of the word "more" in the seventh stanza shows the magnitude of light needed to bring aid and comfort to Ezekiel's mother.

Simile- "Peasants came like swarms of flies" (comparison between two things using the word "like")

The meaning of the poem is simple: Ezekiel wishes to explain the anxieties he and the others around him have regarding his mother's dire situation. The words used earlier add to the anxious mood of the poem and, therefore, convey the meaning behind the poem.

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