I need help to find the theme for each poem and highlight all figurative language and explain them. I am very bad at doing this with poetry. The Best Is Yet To Be (Poem) By Joanna Fuchs...

I need help to find the theme for each poem and highlight all figurative language and explain them. I am very bad at doing this with poetry.

The Best Is Yet To Be (Poem)

By Joanna Fuchs

http://www.poemsource.com/wedding-poems.html

 

Posession (Song)

By Sarah Mclachlan

http://www.lyrics007.com/Sarah%20McLachlan%20Lyrics/Possession%20Lyrics.html

 

 

 

 

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mrs-campbell's profile pic

mrs-campbell | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

As the guidelines of this website allow for one question a day, I can help you with one of those poems; for the others, I suggest submitting them separately.

The main theme of "The Best is Yet to Be" is love, and how love is the most important thing in a marriage, and how it will sustain you no matter what happens.  It has an A/B rhyme pattern, which means that in each stanza of 4 lines, every other line rhymes.  As far as figurative language goes, it is a pretty straight-forward poem without too many techniques.  There is a metaphor, where you compare two things, and that is "but love is the real treasure."  The author is comparing love to a treasure there, which is a metaphor.  Personification, where you give inanimate ideas human-like traits also exists when she describes when "life hands you challenges".  Life does not have hands, so cannot hand you a challenge, so that is personification.  We see it again when she states that "love will hold you steady."  That personification indicates that love has arms to hold one up.

I hope that those thoughts help, at least with this poem; good luck!

akannan's profile pic

Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I can offer some insight into "Possession."  In terms of the rhyme scheme, each stanza's even numbered lines feature a rhyme.  For example, examine the first stanza:  The odd numbered lines are separate and distinct, but the even numbered lines rhyme with one another.  In the subsequent stanzas, the rhyme is the same pattern with a slight variation:  The first two even numbered lines rhyme together, while the last two even numbered lines rhyme together.  For example:  "betrayed" and "enslaved" rhyme together "rhymes" and "alive" go together.  This is repeated in the last stanza, also.  The chorus' rhyme pattern exists in only the last two lines with "tears" and "dear."

The theme of this song is the idea of eternal devotion to another.  There is a great deal of hurt in this song, as the speaker has endured much in the world of emotional disappointment and heartbreak ("And solitude my guide/ Would I spend forever here/ and not be satisfied.")  There has been a struggle to find this love of which the speaker speaks.  Indeed, they have found it with another and this becomes the chorus.  The idea of "hold you down" creates an image that the speaker is almost desperate to not let go of the love they have found.  The opening stanza's figurative language opens the song with a feeling of desolate isolation, almost like the speaker is looking out into a field without their beloved and what is seen is the mournful procession of loves lost, loves denied, and love absent.  This is enhanced with the "voices trapped in yearning/ memories trapped in time" idea.  After the first chorus refrain, the song progresses into a world of figurative language that reveals that the speaker has found this person with whom they wish to be.  The language offered shows a resiliency and strength to "hold on" (another MacLachlan song on the same album) to this love they have found.  The figurative language shows commitment and to some extent, a resistance to anything that will take this love away from them ("Nothing stands between us/ I won't be denied.")  Perhaps, this resiliency or stubbornness comes from not wanting to revisit what it means to the speaker to be alone.

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