Need a good literary translation  and interpretation of the news article below. Not Google translate , need literary translation and interpretation for a group discussion in class....

Need a good literary translation  and interpretation of the news article below. Not Google translate , need literary translation and interpretation for a group discussion in class.

http://mexico.cnn.com/salud/2012/10/30/mexico-vive-con-diversidad-religiosa-pero-con-discriminacion-conapred

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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While I am not a native speaker of Spanish, I am conversant in the language.  Here is my translation of this article.  

According to the results of the National Poll on Discrimination in Mexico 2010, conducted by the National Council for the Prevention of Discrimination (Conapred), there is more religious diversity than ever but there is also more resistance to the acceptance of people whose beliefs are different from those of the majority.

In his presentation of the study (which was conducted from October 14 to November 23, 2010), the president of Conapred, Ricardo Bucio Mujica, said that it is religious minorities who face intolerance from their communities and more difficulties in integrating with their neighbors, their schools, and their organizations.

One out of every four people belonging to a religion other than Catholicism has felt that their rights have not been respected due to their religious beliefs.  According to the poll, while 78% of the country’s population says they have never been subject to religious discrimination, that percentage drops to 68% among those who are not Catholic (the margin of error of the poll was ± 1.1 percentage points).

In comparison to 50 years ago, there is greater religious diversity in Mexico as one in every five people does not belong to the Catholic church, the predominant religion.  Bucio Mujica, citing the news agency Notimex, says that non-Catholics include the 5% of the population who do not profess belief in any type of religion.  He also said that a majority of people recognize that they have the right to believe in any religious faith that they wish.

Nonetheless, said Bucio Mujica, there is still discrimination against minority groups and “we assume that diversity is a threat to society and not a social good.”

One of the conclusions of the poll, which was carried out face to face with 52,095 people is that “if Mexico claims to have religious pluralism, there must be a shared responsibility between believers in any creed, church, and spirituality and even among those who do not believe.  In other words, all people as citizens share in the same rights and the same responsibility for building a more just and fraternal society.”

The 2010 national poll on religious diversity is the second one done in the country by Conapred, with the first having been done in 2005.

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