I need a few quotes on the point of 'Everybody in our world has a story. Discuss in relation to a text studied, in this case 'Of Mice and Men.''I have chosen to base on the characters Curley,...

I need a few quotes on the point of 'Everybody in our world has a story. Discuss in relation to a text studied, in this case 'Of Mice and Men.''

I have chosen to base on the characters Curley, Curley's wife, Lennie and George. I just need some quotes to back up

Curley- how he was a lightweight boxer.

Curley's wife- how she wanted to be an actor.

Lennie- about Aunt Clara's passing.

George- about being on the run looking after Lennie.

Thanks in advance =)

Asked on by katt14

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kiwi | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted on

There are indeed several poignant inner stories in the characters from 'Of Mice and Men'.

Quote about Curley from Candy:

'He done quite a bit in the ring.  He's a lightweight, and he's handy'

It is also worth noting that Curley is described as 'pugancious' in his demeanour as he enters the bunkhouse. He also viciously targets Lennie as 'he hates big guys'.

Curley's wife tells Lennie about her life before Curley and the excitement of meeting a man at a dance hall who told her she had star potential -

He says he was gonna put me in the movies. Said I was a natural. Soon's he got back to Hollywood, he was gonna write to me...

Unfortunately he never did write: Curley's wife believed that her mother stole his letters.

George has very mixed feelings about being with Lennie. He has had plenty of time to contemplate the positive and negative aspects of their relationship. At the beginning of the novel he explodes -

Whatever we ain't got, that's what you want. God a'mighty, if I was alone I could live so easy. I could go get a job an' work, an no trouble. No mess at all, and when the end of the month come I could take my fifty bucks and go into town and get whatever I want...

 

However, when discussing their unique relationship later in the text he observes:

Course Lennie's a God damn nuisance most of the time, but you get used to goin' around with a guy an' you can't get rid of him.

Lennie does not have a clear recollection of Aunt Clara, only to note that she used to give him mice but 'that lady's gone.' He remembers very little until she becomes the voice of his conscience towards the end of the novel.

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