I need critical essays/articles on how F Scott Fitzgerald and his character Jay Gatsby are similar in their quest for the American Dream.The essays must be from scholars or credibal sources. I need...

I need critical essays/articles on how F Scott Fitzgerald and his character Jay Gatsby are similar in their quest for the American Dream.

The essays must be from scholars or credibal sources. I need links/essays/articles. I'm writing a research paper and i need to figure out how both Fitzgerald and Gatsby are similar in their quest for the american dream. I need solid proof!

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epollock | (Level 3) Valedictorian

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Even though Fitzgerald's novel is relentless in its drive toward exposure, and even though it ultimately discredits virtually all its characters, it nonetheless never ceases to revere the dream itself. Moreover, Fitzgerald is less invested in a thinning exercise than in a fattening one. America is the land of the dream, because it is the only country in which people believe in self-making, believe that they are free agents, unconstrained by origin or class or birth. Fitzgerald's book is more committed to creation than it is to criticism: the creations of desire and self and language. We remember the fixation with Daisy's voice. Not only is it allied with money, but also with genesis, with naming the world into being. Words, too, can be free of referent. Fitzgerald struts his stuff verbally, offers us a splendidly "independent" language, shows word creations to be real. One of the most charming episodes of the novel is the "saga" of "Blocks" Biloxi, weird word-creature who seems a ghostly cousin of the other self-made man, Jay Gatsby. Fitzgerald is writing about the power of belief: our belief in words (the miracle of literature) and our belief in others (the miracle of desire). This belief—called "credit" in financial circles—is our covenant with reality, and it has nothing to do with realism.

Listed below are critical essays that you can obtain:

1)  Michael Schudson
American Dreams
Am Lit Hist, FALL 2004; 16: 566 - 573.
......Gatsby as an exploration of the American dream. For Edwin Fussell, Gatsby has to do with the American dream...with power was also a romance with a dream: "For Gatsby, divided between power and dream, comes inevitably to stand for America..

2) Greg Forter
F. Scott Fitzgerald, Modernist Studies, and the Fin-de-Siècle Crisis in Masculinity
American Literature, June 2006; 78: 293 - 323.
......too much for her and not enough for my dream. She realized too late that work was...Fitzgerald must work for money instead of his ``dream''; because of her, he is ``a man divided...and the Politics of Emotion in The Great Gatsby,'' American Literature 68 (June 1996)

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