There Is No Frigate Like A Book Analysis

Please explain "There is no Frigate like a Book" by Emily Dickinson.

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Another educator already focused on the stylistic elements of the poem, so for my analysis, I will focus on the meaning and significance of Emily Dickinson's "There is no Frigate like a Book," taking it line by line.

First off, the title tells us almost everything we need to know about the poem, as do the first two lines of the poem:

There is no Frigate like a Book
To take us Lands away

A frigate is a type of boat, and boats are meant to take you to faraway places. Books, in Dickinson's opinion (and in the opinion of most avid readers), are even better than a ship at taking you to places you have never been before. You don't even have to leave your chair to visit places across the globe and go on grand adventures; all you have to do is read a book.

The next two lines are about poetry, which is just as adept at taking you out of your current location or state of being:

Nor any Coursers like a Page
Of prancing Poetry –

"Coursers" are horses that in this case are meant to represent any form of...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 654 words.)

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