I need 4 quotes from To Kill A Mockingbird that were said by the character Jem. I have to have ten and I already have six, obviously. I just can't seem to find any more good ones that I'd like to...

I need 4 quotes from To Kill A Mockingbird that were said by the character Jem. 

I have to have ten and I already have six, obviously. I just can't seem to find any more good ones that I'd like to use. And if you could, could you please include the chapter number? Thanks!

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amarang9 | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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Here are four quotes from To Kill a Mockingbird which illustrate Jem's maturity. 

In Chapter 10, Jem stops looking at Atticus as a feeble old man and admires him for refusing to boast about his talents. This comes right after Atticus shoots Tim Johnson's dog. “Naw, Scout, it’s something you wouldn’t understand. Atticus is real old, but I wouldn’t care if he couldn’t do anything—I wouldn’t care if he couldn’t do a blessed thing.” Jem concludes that he is a gentleman, just like Atticus. A gentleman does what he has to do, not feeling the need to seek approval from others. 

In Chapter 23, Jem shows his maturity when he is discouraged that a jury could find Tom guilty. “You just can’t convict a man on evidence like that—you can’t.” 

At the end of Chapter 23, Jem, upset with the verdict, has an epiphany about the way society works and supposes why Boo Radley doesn't want any part of such a place. "I think I’m beginning to understand why Boo Radley’s stayed shut up in the house all this time… it’s because he wants to stay inside.” 

In Chapter 26, Jem is still trying to deal with how ugly people can be. Scout tells him about how her teacher, Miss Gates, was condemning Hitler. Jem has no problem with this. Then Scout tells him how Miss Gates made racist comments coming out of the courthouse. And when Scout reasons that it is hypocritical to hate someone evil like Hitler and yet hate African-Americans for no reason, Jem gets upset. 

I never wanta hear about that courthouse again, ever, ever, you hear me? You hear me? Don’t you ever say one word to me about it again, you hear? Now go on! 

Atticus tells Scout that Jem is trying to forget something until he is old enough to deal with it. Jem struggles to accept the reality that there is racism, hatred, and hypocrisy even in a court of law in his home town. 

Sources:

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