From To Kill A Mockingbird, I need 3 examples of why Boo is a hero. Please help. I already have that he saves Jem and Scout. What are two more?

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lsumner's profile pic

lsumner | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

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In To Kill A Mockingbird, Boo Radley is a hero the night Jem tears his pants on the fence. Jem has to strip down, leaving his pants caught in the fence. Boo Radley finds the pants. He notices the pants are ripped. Boo sews the pants and folds them and places them on top the fence so Jem can find them. Boo Radley's actions are honorable. He is a hero by saving Jem from having to explain why his pants are torn. 

On the night that Miss Maudie's house catches on fire, Scout is sitting outside in the cold, watching the house burn. Boo behaves like a hero by getting a blanket and putting it around a shivering Scout. Out of nowhere, Boo appears and quickly places the blanket on Scout. Then he disappears.

When Boo performs these acts of kindness, Jem and Scout see a different side to Boo's personality. He has a big heart. Truly, Boo cares about Jem and Scout. He treats them with tenderness. Boo is not as scary as Jem and Scout had once imagined. He does become like hero for the children:  

Boo is revealed to be a gentle soul through his unseen acts: the gifts he leaves in the tree; his mending of Jem's torn pants; the blanket he puts around Scout the night of the fire; and finally, his rescue of the children from Bob Ewell' s murderous attack.

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mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Under the definition of heroic as "behavior that is bold or dramatic, especially unexpectedly so" (The American College Dictionary), there are a couple more acts that may be considered heroic in light of Boo's circumstances of unjust repression.

1. Boo risks severe repercussions when he (allegedly) defiantly sticks scissors into the leg of his repressive father. According to neighborhood legend, Boo has been confined to his home after he became the companion of some of the Cunninghams from Old Sarum, "an enormous and confusing tribe" with whom he was arrested for disorderly conduct. The judge sentenced the teenaged boys to the state industrial school, but Mr. Radley, feeling this school a "disgrace" and a "prison," asked the judge to release Arthur to his care and there would be no further trouble. From then on, Arthur was imprisoned in his own home for a period much longer than that which the Cunninghams spent at the industrial school.

According to Miss Stephanie, after having been imprisoned in his home for years, Arthur drove scissors he was using to cut some items from The Maycomb Tribune in his scrapbook. When his stringent and repressive father walked past him, Arthur "boldly and dramatically" drove these scissors into his parent's leg, an act that conveyed his feelings toward this unjust man. Mrs. Radley ran into the street, screaming that Arthur was killing them. However, when the sheriff arrived, Arthur was placidly sitting in the living room, cutting up The Tribune.

2. Boo Radley apparently braves leaving the house in which he has been confined for years and places tokens into the knothole of a tree the children pass on their way home. His gifts of two soap figures who resemble Jem and Scout is especially dramatic because it suggests that he has been watching the children and wishes to interact with them. He later puts a pocket watch that no longer runs that is on a chain with an aluminum knife, an object that must have been a personal possession of his.

This act is apparently considered "unexpectedly bold" since Nathan Radley cements the hole so that Boo can no longer leave anything for the children.

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