To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

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I need an example of direct characterization and an example of indirect characterization from To Kill a Mockingbird.

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Direct characterization is when an author explicitly describes a character using adjectives or elaborates on their personality, desires, and feelings. Harper Lee uses direct characterization to describe Dill's character. In chapter one, Jem and Scout meet Dill for the first time and Scout describes him by saying, "...he wasn’t much higher than the collards" (Lee, 4). After meeting Dill, the children become fast friends and spend the majority of their summer together. Dill is an entertaining, intuitive child and Scout uses direct characterization to describe his fascinating personality by saying,

Thus we came to know Dill as a pocket Merlin, whose head teemed with eccentric plans, strange longings, and quaint fancies. (Lee, 4)

In chapter three, Scout has her first encounter with a member of the Ewell family. Scout proceeds to use direct characterization to describe Burris Ewell by saying,

He was the filthiest human I had ever seen. His neck was dark gray, the backs of his hands were rusty, and his...

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